Uruguay Heart Studies

In July 2014, it was reported that anti-tobacco measures in the country had resulted in a 22 percent decerase in heart attacks.

Uruguay
Sebrie, E.M.; Sandoya, E.; Bianco, E.; Hyland, A.; Cummings, K.M.; Glantz, S.A., "Hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction before and after implementation of a comprehensive smoke-free policy in Uruguay: experience through 2010," Tobacco Control 23(6): 471-472, November 2014.

This study, a follow-up to an earlier study into the same topic, examined Uruguayan hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) 37 hospitals for two years before and four years after Uruguay implemented a 100% nationwide smoke-free law. The authors found four years after implementation, a 17 percent drop in AMI admissions. The authors wrote, "Adding two more years of follow-up data confirmed that Uruguay's smoke-free law was followed by a substantial and sustained reduction in AMI hospitalizations."

Sebrie, E.M.; Sandoya, E.; Hyland, A.; Bianco, E.; Glantz, S.A.; Cummings, K.M., "Hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction before and after implementation of a comprehensive smoke-free policy in Uruguay," Tobacco Control [Epub ahead of print], February 15, 2012.

This study examined Uruguayan hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) from 37 hospitals for two years before and 2 years after implementation of a clean indoor air law. Two years after the smoke-free policy was enacted, hospital admissions for AMI fell by 22 percent. The same pattern and roughly the same magnitude of reduction in AMI admissions were also observed for patients seen in public and private hospitals, men, women, and people aged 40-65.