Policymaker Quotes in Support of Smokefree Air


August 9, 2017

 

Jack Spicer, Former Mayor, Cheyenne, WY

"The Depot Plaza was a really fun project, and it's something that the people of Cheyenne can be proud of. And if you go to another part of the state that didn't (ban smoking in public places), you can really appreciate how nice it is to be able to walk into a restaurant without having to inhale secondhand smoke."

Quoted In:

Huguelet, A., "Cheyenne mayors bask in past, predict future," Wyoming Business Report, August 8, 2017.


Ivy Spohnholz, Alaska Representative, Chair of House Health and Social Services Committee

"I support the smoke-free workplace initiative because it affects the health of all Alaskans, and look forward to hearing SB 63."

Quoted In:

Raines, L., "For fourth year in a row, Alaska Legislature considers bill to make all workplaces smoke-free," KTVA, February 21, 2017.


Adam Wool, Alaska Representative

RE: SB 63, a smokefree bill: "Obviously there's some details about it that need to be worked out, but I think overall, it's a good bill, and I would imagine we're going to look at it again."

Quoted In:

Raines, L., "For fourth year in a row, Alaska Legislature considers bill to make all workplaces smoke-free," KTVA, February 21, 2017.


Joan Shannon, City Council President, Burlington, VT

This letter described the opposition to Burlington, Vermont's smokefree ordinance and the city's positive experience with the law. Shannon stated, "Banning smoking is the right thing to do for the health of workers, but as it turns out, it is also good for business. Burlington has a lot of tourism from Montreal where there is a much higher smoking rate. The fear was that the Canadians wouldn't come anymore. They still come. Even though 25% of Quebecois smoked (at the time we passed the ordinance), 75% didn't smoke. That is why smoking bans are always good for business. Smokers are the minority in ANY demographic you look at. Even if it is a large minority, it is still a minority."

Quoted In:

Shannon, J., "[Letter to New Orleans, Louisiana, City Council re: Burlington, Vermont's positive experience with a smokefree ordinance]," Burlington, VT: City of Burlington, [n.d.].


Mike Hein, Ulster County, New York, Executive

"It is important to amend Ulster County's Anti-Smoking Law to address technological changes and ensure the health and well-being of our citizens from the harmful and negative effects of secondhand smoke and vapors. The vapors emitted from these devices may still have the same harmful and negative effects of secondhand smoke on bystanders. By amending this law, we are ensuring that our employees, residents, children and visitors are not exposed to the potentially harmful vapors at any of our properties and we set a very clear and positive example. I want to personally commend Legislator Jeanette Provenzano and her colleagues for voting for this important amendment to the County Law."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Hein signs law to strenghthen county's anti-smoking law," Saugerties Post-Star, March 19, 2015.


Josh Miller, Rhode Island State Senator

State Senator Josh Miller, an opponent of the original law, spoke and described his change of heart on the smokefree issue, stating that, "I thought it was kind of disruptive to what had been the bar and restaurant model for many years. I was very concerned at that point. I think the position of myself and others transitioned as the conversation became less about the status quo of restaurants and more about worker safety." Miller added that "very quickly everyone was glad the law had changed ... People have adapted in a very positive way very quickly."

Quoted In:

Salit, R., "Health focus: on 10th anniversary of R.I. smoking ban, advocates push ahead," Providence Journal, February 28, 2015.


Aruna Miller, Maryland State Delegate

Re: her bill to include electronic cigarettes in the state's smokefree air law: "We need to err on the side of public health until all the evidence comes out."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "E-cigarettes: still a mystery," Star Democrat, February 24, 2015.


Joe Bolkcom, Iowa State Senator

Regarding bills to regulate electronic cigarettes that are supported by the industry: "It should always raise red flags when people who are trying to addict you to their product come up with what appears to be a good public health measure. We're in the process of making the same mistakes that we made with tobacco. We're going to see a whole generation of people addicted to these products."

Quoted In:

Szabo, L., "States racing to regulate e-cigarettes," USA Today, February 7, 2015.


DeLena Johnson, Mayor, Palmer, Alaska

"I've not had anyone come to me and ask to have that initiative revisited that was a bar owner. I know some bar owners that say they will not allow smoking even if it were allowed in other places. It seems like it's good for business in general. We're in a really good place with this [ordinance]. All the other communities are having to decide what does the state allow and what they're going to allow. The city of Palmer already has a smoke-free ordinance that covers smoking in public and e-cigarettes."

Quoted In:

O'Connor, B., "Smoking law might change," Mat-Su Valley Frontiersman, January 24, 2015.


LaToya Cantrell, City Councilor, New Orleans, LA

"People don't come to New Orleans to smoke. They come here to partake in our culture, in our music, in our food, and it is time for us to be a progressive city. Everyone, all of our employees, they deserve a smoke-free environment. Second-hand smoke kills. We now have over 27 of our national conventioneers saying look we will not return to New Orleans if it is not a smoke free city, and so when you talk about revenues, we stand to lose millions."

Quoted In:

Bolano, V., "Tougher smoking laws may soon come to NOLA [VIDEO]," WGNO, November 21, 2014.


LaToya Cantrell, City Councilor, New Orleans, LA

Regarding a smokefree ordinance she had proposed: "We're moving forward as a city. [This legislation] is is not about attacking someone who wishes to smoke. This is about protecting our workforce, protecting our residents, who wish to live in smoke-free environments, and to make sure the disparities that exist in our city are eliminated."

Quoted In:

Woodward, A., "LaToya Cantrell to introduce smoke-free legislation Nov. 20," Gambit Blog of New Orleans, November 12, 2014.



Terry Branstad, Iowa Governor

On his support for smokefree casinos: "I don't think it's right, I don't think it's fair that the people who work in that industry are subject to this second-hand smoke."

Quoted In:

Lynch, J.Q., "Branstad open to smoke-free casinos, changing gaming revenue distribution," Sioux City Journal, October 16, 2014.


Herb Perez, City Councilor, Foster City, CA

On his support for a proposed multiunit housing smokefree ordinance: "I do favor, because of the impact to others, a ban on smoking in multiunit dwellings. I think that those people are of lesser economic ways and means; they have lesser choices. The last thing they should have to consider when they're renting that apartment is whether a smoker lives next door."

Quoted In:

Yesko, S.P., "Foster City considers expanding smoking regulation to apartment units," San Francisco Examiner, May 25, 2014.


Donovan Richards, New York City Councilman

"The only way to protect nonsmokers from exposure to the toxins found in cigarettes within the confines of their homes is to create entirely smoke-free housing. Considering the correlation between poor health and exposure to cigarette smoke, I strongly urge the de Blasio administration as they study ways to meet their affordable housing goal, to require that all 200,000 of the newly created or preserved housing units be smoke free. Children exposed to the toxins found in cigarette smoke face further detriment to their quality of life. hey are more likely to develop ear and respiratory infections along with asthma-like symptoms that can have wider impacts on their ability to lead healthy and fulfilling lives."

Quoted In:

Giambusso, D., "Councilman calls for smoking ban in new affordable housing," Capital New York, May 13, 2014.


Kristina Lawson, Mayor Pro Tem, Walnut Creek, CA

"I am proud to hear that ... it will be the toughest secondhand smoke ordinance in the county. That is exactly where the city of Walnut Creek should be on an issue like this."

Quoted In:

Nardi, E., "Walnut Creek passes toughest secondhand smoking law in the Contra Costa County," Contra Costa Times, September 19, 2013.


John Gore, Mayor, Marysville, Ohio

Regarding a smokefree ordinance for city-owned property: "I just thought it was the right thing to do and council thought it was the right thing to do. ... I've been in a few meetings recently (where) we have been praised for taking that step. Mostly the meetings have been with the health department but still, they've been very appreciative."

Quoted In:

Rogan, A., "City's tobacco-free rule takes effect July 17," Marysville News, July 20, 2013.


Janet Petersen, Iowa State Senator

Regarding the state's smokefree air law: Probably out of all the legislation I've worked on, that's one that I'm most proud of because I think it's changed people's every-day lives."

Quoted In:

Boshart, R., "Iowa's smoke-free air law marks five-year anniversary," Gazette, June 30, 2013.


Timothy Moriarty, Mayor, Rocky Hill, CT

In June 2013, the Rocky Hill, Connecticut, Town Council passed a smokefree ordinance for all government grounds and properties, including parks and concerts in the parks. Mayor Timothy Moriarty stated, "I think this is the way to go and I'm 100 percent for it. Everywhere you go it is already smoke-free. All state buildings, hospitals and schools are smoke-free. I think it's the direction we are going in."

Quoted In:

Mayer, R., "All Rocky Hill grounds and properties will be smoke-free: that will include schools and parks in town, even during summer concerts," Rocky Hill Patch, June 13, 2013.


Jim Thompson, Oregon State Representative

"Because of secondhand smoke, we've already banned smoking in restaurants and bars, public buildings, trains, planes, buses, taxis, many parks. And the list goes on, including the chamber that we're now sitting in. It is, however, legal to strap your kids in the back seat of your car and smoke them like bacon."

Quoted In:

Northwest News Network, "Oregon lawmakers vote to ban smoking in cars with children present," OPB.org, June 3, 2013.


Liz Kniss, Palo Alto, California, City Councilor

"I think it would be fabulous to have Palo Alto as a smoke-free park city. We could put it on our letterhead. Maybe we should just rule out smoking in the entire city. ... It's a great headline: Palo Alto bans smoking in all ... 4,500 acres of our parkland."

Quoted In:

Green, J., "Palo Alto City Council bans smoking in all parks," San Jose Mercury News, May 14, 2013.


Andrew Cuomo, New York Governor

"Our state parks embody the rich, natural beauty that New York has to offer, and our residents should be able to enjoy them free of pollution from second hand smoke."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Smoke-free zones in NYC parks expanded for summer," Epoch Times, May 11, 2013.


Esther Sanchez, Oceanside, California, City Councilor

Regarding her proposed smokefree outdoor dining ordinance: “Summer is coming and every single restaurant in town wants to have the opportunity to have outdoor dining. Families do not want to be sitting outside enjoying dinner with outside smoke."

Quoted In:

Yee, P., "City looks to ban restaurant patio smoking," Coast News, May 10, 2013.


Toni Moceri, Macomb County, Michigan, Commissioner

Regarding an ordinance making a smokefree zone around entrances to county-owned buildings: "This is just another way for us to create a health-friendly environment for people when they need to do business with the county. We don't want people to have a negative experience when they visit one of our buildings; we want them to feel like their health is a priority for us. ... We're really trying to move Macomb County buildings more in line with modern standards."

Quoted In:

Selweski, J., "New ordinance prohibits smoking within 100 feet of county buildings," candgnews.com, April 30, 2013.


Kenny Davidson, Mayor, Buckhannon, WV

"All of us know, that smoking is not good for us. We've been told that for years. I have some concerns about personal freedoms, but I think as a non-smoker, I have a right not to breathe in second hand smoke."

Quoted In:

Kippen, T., "Buckhannon City Council passes smoking ban in parks," WDTV.COM 5 News, April 4, 2013.


Diane Hanson, Mayor, Dewey Beach, Dealware

Re: a proposed smokefree beach ordinance: "A lot of people have requested it in town. And it’s something that other towns have been doing. It's not so much that the smoking bothers them – I mean the smoke does bother people on the beach, especially with children. But the other reason is just that people discard their cigarette butts and they wash up and they look terrible."

Quoted In:

Parra, E., "Dewey considers a smoking ban for its beach visitors," delawareonline.com, April 3, 2013.


Michael Bloomberg, Mayor, New York City

"Ten years ago, opponents of the Smoke-Free Air Act said it would hurt the restaurant and bar business, damage our tourism industry, and lead to job losses and lost tax revenue. But in fact, just the opposite happened."

Quoted In:

Parra, E., "Dewey considers a smoking ban for its beach visitors," delawareonline.com, April 3, 2013.


Nicholas Sacco, Mayor, North Bergen, NJ

On a smokefree parks ordinance: "The dangerous effects of second hand smoke on children are well known and we feel that protecting North Bergen's youngsters while they enjoy our beautiful parks is an important priority. We are proud to adopt this ordinance and join the growing list of smokefree communities in New Jersey. It is a law whose time has come and we are always proud to make North Bergen even more of a healthy, safe and progressive community."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "North Bergen adopts ordinance to ban smoking in public parks," Hudson Reporter, March 15, 2013.


Leroy Vaughn, Mayor Pro Tem, Lewisville, TX

On the economic impact of the city's smokefree ordinance: "The new ordinance has been in place for nearly five months and has not slowed down our restaurant traffic in the slightest. In fact, citywide restaurant receipts were up 4.25 percent year-over-year during the first quarter operating under the new ordinance."

Quoted In:

Goodwin, H.M., "Lewisville restaurants sales unaffected by smoking ordinance," Lewisvillle Leader Star, March 1, 2013.


James Kunke, Community Relations & Tourism Director, Lewisville, TX

On the economic impact of the city's smokefree ordinance: "We're not attributing the increase in revenue to the ordinance - it could be because of the economy, the holidays or other factors. The real point is that sales didn't go down due to the ordinance. Some people insisted that the ordinance would cause restaurants to lose money or even close and that didn't happen."

Quoted In:

Goodwin, H.M., "Lewisville restaurants sales unaffected by smoking ordinance," Lewisvillle Leader Star, March 1, 2013.


Marc Levin, California Assemblyman

Regarding a smokefree multiunit housing bill he had introduced: "Californians should be able to breathe clean air in their own homes. Whenever a neighbor lights up, everyone in the building smokes with them."

Quoted In:

Sanders, J., "California bill would ban smoking in multi-unit housing," San Luis Obispo Tribune, February 27, 2013.


Jacob Hummel, Missouri State Representative and Minority Leader

On the House Democratic Caucus policy that legislators make their Capitol building offices smokefree: "It's 2013, we just can't do it anymore. It's an embarrassment that the state capitol is the only place in state government where people can smoke. There's no reason that we should be above the law. We should not be special, we should not be better than any other state employee or any visitor to this capitol."

Quoted In:

Spain, E., "Target 8: lawmakers still smoke in their Capitol offices," KOMU, February 26, 2013.


Kani­ela Ing, Hawaii State Representive

"Maui is known for our world-renown beaches. In addition to the health risk to smokers and risks caused by second hand smoke, cigarette butts are still one of the primary causes of litter on Maui. I introduced this measure to keep our beaches clean and ensure that both residents and visitors are able to enjoy their beach-going experiences and keep their children safe."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Maui's Ing's first proposal: statewide smoking ban on beaches," Maui TV News, January 30, 2013.


Terry Branstad, Iowa Governor

On his desire for smokefree casinos legislation: "I just think in terms of fairness, we have a law that’s designed to protect people’s health having clean indoor air. They have an exception."

Quoted In:

Pempus, B., "Iowa Governor wants no more smoking in casinos," Card Player, January 21, 2013.


Chuck Cahn, Mayor, Cherry Hill, New Jersey

"Simply put, our residents deserve to breathe clean air. At the end of the day, this change will protect the public from the harmful effects of secondhand smoke and allow the people of Cherry Hill to enjoy our beautiful outdoor spaces without being subjected to a major health hazard."

Quoted In:

Kinchen , D., "Smoking ban passed in Cherry Hill," myfoxphilly.com, November 26, 2012.


Gary Phillips, Mayor, San Rafael, CA

"We are happy to blaze a trail. We're most happy to be in the forefront of the issue [smokefree multiunit housing] because we think it will greatly benefit our residents and those visiting San Rafael, and we think it will set the tone for other cities as well."

Quoted In:

Cohen, R., "San Rafael smoking ban: California city bars smoking in duplexes, condominiums and other multi-family homes," Huffington Post, October 15, 2012.


Joseph Merrill, Broome County, NY, Legislator

"We’re finding out more and more every day about the bad effects of smoke - especially secondhand smoke. We should all be moving towards this."

Quoted In:

Reilly, S., "Smoking ban proposed for Broome County's parks," pressconnects.com, September 12, 2012.


Bob Henderson, City Councilman, Whittier, CA

Re: a proposed smokefree parks ordinance: "We've seen an incredible change in the state of California since cities started restrictions on restaurants and bars. ... It's not right to sit there and put employees or citizens at risk and discomfort."

Quoted In:

Sprague, M., "Whittier council votes to ban smoking in parks," Whittier council votes to ban smoking in parks, September 12, 2012.


Terry McDonald, Mayor, New Haven, Indiana

"We enjoy eating out — let’s face it! I don’t think it [state smokefree air law] will have a big impact in the long run."

Quoted In:

Hacha-Thomas, N., "City eateries adjusting to new smoking ban," Fort Wayne Daily News, July 20, 2012.


Chip Johnson, Mayor, Hernando, Mississippi and President, Mississippi Municipal League

"If I hear one more person say it's a private business decision, I am going to explode. This isn't about telling someone what not to do. It's about protecting people. It's not a business decision. It's a health decision."

Quoted In:

Ruddiman, S., "Mississippi municipalities celebrate going smoke free," Mississippi Press, June 27, 2012.


John Proud, Legislator, Oswego County, New York

Residents of all ages enjoy the pristine environment of our parks and trails. People should be able to use and exercise in all Oswego County-owned parks without being exposed to the harmful effects of secondhand smoke. By adopting a tobacco-free parks policy, we are taking a pro-active stance toward improving the health and well-being of our community and the environment."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Oswego County Legislature adopts tobacco-free parks policy," June 25, 2012.


Michael Hancock, Mayor, Denver, Colorado

"I am committed to public health and the safety of everyone who visits, lives in or conducts business in our great city. DIA is the last public building in Colorado where indoor smoking lounges are still in operation. While they are legally allowed, we believe the responsible decision is to eliminate these facilities in order to better protect the wellbeing of everyone who uses the airport."

Quoted In:

Schiavone, J., "Denver International Airport moves toward becoming smoke-free," Denver, CO: Denver International Airport, May 18, 2012.


Scott Dellinger, Mayor, Mountain View, WY

Regarding a smokefree ordinance passed by the town: "There is a couple other establishments just down the road in the county that they could go to for smoking, but from what I understand, it hasn’t increased or decreased that."

Quoted In:

Byer, K., "Standing on a ‘slippery slope’ of evidence," Casper Star-Tribune, April 22, 2012.


Hugh Holliman, Former North Carolina State Representative

"For years, the U.S. surgeon general has warned that there is no safe level of exposure to secondhand smoke and that as little as 30 minutes of exposure can trigger a heart attack in patients who have heart disease or risk factors for heart disease. Moreover, long-term exposure is linked to a number of types of cancer, as well as a variety of lung diseases, including asthma, emphysema and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This is why I worked so hard to enact the 2010 law that made North Carolina’s restaurants and bars smoke-free. ... In the short two years that the smoke-free law has been in effect, lives have been saved, workers' health has been protected and millions of patrons can dine out or have a drink with friends without putting their health at risk. Our law is huge step in the right direction for our state's health."

Quoted In:

Holliman, H., "Guest column: state's smoking ban has helped save lives," High Point Enterprise, February 13, 2012.


Chris Massey, Mississippi State Senator

"When you take into consideration the health problems, the situation of people who don't smoke but have to take jobs, any job, in this economic climate, this (bill) can be a good thing and help with those issues that are costing this state millions of dollars a year."

Quoted In:

Bailey, H., "Hernando mayor backs smoke-free proposal: Chip Johnson supports law aimed at businesses," Memphis Commercial Appeal, February 12, 2012.


Chip Johnson, Mayor, Hernando, MIssissippi and President, Mississippi Municipal League

"I'm not telling people not to smoke. I know it's a personal choice. But it stops being personal when in Mississippi, 510 people died last year from causes related to secondhand smoke. Those were 510 innocent people killed by smokers. ... It is not a partisan issue, it's a public health issue."

Quoted In:

Bailey, H., "Hernando mayor backs smoke-free proposal: Chip Johnson supports law aimed at businesses," Memphis Commercial Appeal, February 12, 2012.


David Rollins, City Councilmember, Augusta, ME

"There is no doubt, that even in a second-hand manner, tobacco smoke causes cancer and other things. No one wants to be at a game sitting in a cloud of smoke. Trust me, when you're a non-smoker, it's readily apparent."

Quoted In:

Edwards, K., "No smoking on city property," Kennebec Journal, January 6, 2012.


Gary Richardson, Mayor, Midfield, AL

Regarding a unanimously passed smokefree ordinance: "This is really making a statement that second-hand smoke affects the health and welfare of our citizens in ways previously unknown."

Quoted In:

Norris, T., "Midfield passes wide-ranging ordinance banning smoking in public places," Birmingham News, November 29, 2011.


Senator David B. McBride, P.E. (D), Delaware

" I can tell you that as I enter my 34th year in the Delaware legislature my proudest moment was the day Governor Minner signed my legislation, the Clean Indoor Air Act, which as you may know is the most restrictive in the United States. Many organizations and individuals made it possible. Thank you for the work which you do."

Quoted In:

McBride, D.B., "Email to ANR: Re: Did the Smokefree Law Save Nancy's Life?," November 10, 2011.


Craig Cornwell, City Attorney, Compton, California

Regarding a smokefree multiunit housing ordinance: "The most important thing we can do as leaders of this community is protect the health, safety and welfare of our citizens. …The current research and evidence regarding secondhand smoke [show] that it comes through vents, that it goes through walls, that it stays in dwellings regardless of whether windows are open."

Quoted In:

De Gruy, L., "Compton approves strict ban on smoking," Los Angeles Wave, November 2, 2011.


Yvonne Arceneaux, City Councilwoman, Compton, California

Regarding a smokefree multiunit housing ordinance and smoking neighbors in her daughter's building: "When I went to … visit my daughter I couldn’t believe it. Her place was a designated non-smoking area but you could [still] smell it. It was horrible. So, your own private domicile and what you do in it might affect the person either living on the side of you or beneath. … My grandchildren never had asthma until they got that apartment. They were exposed to that smoking."

Quoted In:

De Gruy, L., "Compton approves strict ban on smoking," Los Angeles Wave, November 2, 2011.


Eric Perrodin, Mayor, Compton, California

Regarding a smokefree multiunit housing ordinance: “When it [smoking] starts to affect somebody else, you have to take a second look.”

Quoted In:

De Gruy, L., "Compton approves strict ban on smoking," Los Angeles Wave, November 2, 2011.


Jeff Duclos, City Councilmember, Hermosa Beach, CA

Regarding an outdoor smoking ordinance: "The proposal is to limit public exposure to secondhand and thirdhand smoke in public places. It is to complement existing state law and it is not unprecedented. I think that, ultimately, this council has made clean air policy a priority in this city."

Quoted In:

Morino, D., "Hermosa Beach passes restrictive ban on smoking in public places," Daily Breeze, October 26, 2011.


Jeff Butler, Mayor, Mantachie, Mississippi

"It has gone even better than I expected. At the time (of the proposal), most people were really looking forward to it, and the businesses have done a good job adopting. I think, in the end, it was what's best for Mantachie's overall health."

Quoted In:

Armour, A., "Mantachie marks five years of being smoke-free," Itawamba County Times, NEMS360.com, [October 22, 2011?].


Dan Watson, Former Mayor, Mantachie, Mississippi

"I haven't heard any complaints from people coming into my store. Personally, I think it's been wonderful. It's just a lot more comfortable now when you sit down at a restaurant to eat or go out to shop. I can definitely tell a difference in the town."

Quoted In:

Armour, A., "Mantachie marks five years of being smoke-free," Itawamba County Times, NEMS360.com, [October 22, 2011?].


Eric Turner, Indiana State Representative

"Indiana is behind the curve. In other states, you can take your children and babies (into restaurants) and know they'll not have to breathe secondhand smoke."

Quoted In:

Higgins, W., "Smokefree workplace advocates gather at Statehouse," Indianapolis Star, September 8, 2010.


John Askvig, City Commissioner, Bismarck, ND

"As you know, smoking has been proven to have links to cancer and causing cancerous things, and I think it's a positive step for not only the citizens but for those working in those environments. We also have regulations over how they cook their food or how old you have to be to get a drink at their bar or their establishment, and I see this in the very same light as that."

Quoted In:

Clouston, K., "Will Bismarck go smoke free?," KFYR-TV North Dakota, August 10, 2010.


Bobby Shriver, Mayor, Santa Monica, California

"Even though I fully take the home is your castle kind of concept, it's not your castle for various things already under the law. You can't have certain controlled substances in your home. You can't engage in certain kinds of activities in your home. And why your right to engage in putting carcinogens into babies should be protected is beyond me."

Quoted In:

Friedman, J., "Council expands residential smoking ban," LookOut News, July 29, 2010.


Thomas M. Menino, Mayor, Boston, Massachusetts

"This new initiative will go a long way to encourage more healthy living styles for our residents. You don’t live in a single family home, you are in multiunit housing. What you do there has an effect on all other folks living in that building."

Quoted In:

McKim, J.B., "BHA pushes for smoke-free housing: ban in Hub could be nation’s largest," Boston Globe, July 27, 2010.


Ray Basham, Michigan State Senator

"Casinos may be a safe-haven for smokers, but they're like a gas chamber for workers. Most Michigan bars and restaurants have gone smoke-free without any major uproar or a decrease in business, and have been able to still accommodate smokers without putting their non-smoking patrons and employees in harm's way."

Quoted In:

Oosting, J., "State Sen. Ray Basham seeks to expand Michigan smoking ban to Detroit casinos," Michigan Live, July 6, 2010.


Jim O'Neal, Mayor, Springfield, Missouri

"We should no more subject Springfield's workers to the injuries of secondhand smoke than we would ask a body shop owner to not protect people painting cars by wearing masks."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Springfield MO mayor proposes indoor smoking ban," KY3, June 10, 2010.


Otis Johnson, Mayor, Savannah, Georgia

"If someone in 2010 doesn't understand the dangers of smoking and they want to smoke, then they have a right to kill themselves if they want to, but they don't have the right to kill other people. We're not on the cutting edge of this. We're just catching up with communities that are very serious about having a healthy environment for their citizens. I have a heart condition, and when I'm in a smoke-filled environment I can feel the impact of it."

Quoted In:

Mach, T., "Mayor proposes making Savannah smoke-free," WSAV, June 9, 2010.


Don Ness, Mayor, Duluth, MN

"In my mind, this is a question about giving residents the ability to choose whether they live in a smoke-free environment or not. When you have a great deal of smoking in a public building, you are putting that asset to risk. These are public tax dollars that are used to support these public housing units, and if we can either discourage or limit the amount of smoking that happens on our public facilities, I think that it makes good sense."

Quoted In:

Cowardin, D. Jawaid, F., "Survey shows support for smoking ban in public housing: three-fourths of the renters living in public housing say they would rather live in a smoke-free environment," Duluth News Tribune, July 23, 2009.


Bev Perdue, North Carolina Governor

"Today is an important and historic day for North Carolina – a day to applaud Rep. Hugh Holliman and Sen. William Purcell for protecting the health of North Carolinians. I have vigorously supported efforts to reduce and eliminate smoking and this bill will help more North Carolina citizens avoid the dangers of secondhand smoke."

Quoted In:

Perdue, B., "Statement from Gov. Perdue on Smoking Ban bill," Office of Governor Bev Perdue, State of North Carolina, May 14, 2009.


Gerry Richardson, Mayor, Parkville, Missouri

"The issue is important for Parkville for the same reason it is important to everyone else; second-hand smoke is a killer. It is a real hazard to the public and employees where it is allowed."

Quoted In:

Rice, G.E., "Parkville puts limits on smoking," Kansas City Star, May 12, 2009.


Jim Doyle, Wisconsin Governor

"Today, Wisconsin is taking an important step to save lives and protect our kids and citizens from the scourge of tobacco. I wish the ban would be implemented sooner, but I am proud the state is embracing the healthy direction the world is going. Making Wisconsin smoke-free will save money in health care costs, improve public health across the state and save lives."

Quoted In:

Marley, P. Walters, S. Forster, S., "Assembly, Senate pass indoor smoking ban," Milwaukee (WI) Journal-Sentinel, April 14, 2009.


Mac McGilvray, Verona, Wisconsin, Alderman

"We are not banning someone from the right to smoke, they can do that. What we are saying, someone's right to be self-destructive does not supersede my right to be in a healthy environment. It's pretty clear this is bad. This is bad for everyone. If you want to do it, you should do it in the privacy of your own home. The sooner you make this very difficult for people to continue on with this habit, the better off we're going to be as a community and as a world."

Quoted In:

Fischer, J., "Verona goes smoke free," Wisconsin Radio Network, March 24, 2009.


Hugh Holliman, North Carolina State Representative

"There is overwhelming scientific evidence that proves secondhand smoke causes heart disease, lung cancer, respiratory illnesses and kills tens of thousands of Americans every year. It is time for North Carolina to join the growing momentum across the nation to protect the rights of all our citizens to breathe clean, smoke-free air."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "No smoking: House bill would bar lighting up in workplaces, bars and restaurants," Fayetteville Observer, January 30, 2009.


Hugh Holliman, North Carolina State Representative

"There is no safe level of exposure to secondhand smoke."

Quoted In:

Johnson, M., "Smoking ban proponents gear up," News & Observer, January 30, 2009.


Myra Crownover, Texas State Representative

"The benefits of a statewide smoke-free law are undeniable. It's good for health, good for business and saves money now spent on healthcare. …No one should be forced to choose between their health and a paycheck."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Poll finds most Texans want smoking ban," Austin Business Journal, January 29, 2009.


Greig Smith, Los Angeles, California, City Council member

"As far as I'm concerned, the only place smoking should be allowed is in someone's home."

Quoted In:

Orlov, R., "Smoking banned at farmers markets," LA Daily News, September 10, 2008.


Wendy Greuel, Los Angeles, California, City Council member

Regarding a smokefree farmers markets ordinance: "It seems wrong to allow smoking in an area where people are going to buy healthy food."

Quoted In:

Orlov, R., "Smoking banned at farmers markets," LA Daily News, September 10, 2008.


Bobby Jameson, City Council member, North Charleston, SC

"We have an obligation to protect non-smokers where we believe we have a health hazard."

Quoted In:

Wise, W., "No public smoking ban for North Charleston," Post and Courier, May 15, 2008.


Glenn Anderson, Michigan Senator

Senator Anderson described a smokefree air law as "one of the most important issues we will debate this year, in terms of protecting public health and reducing preventable smoking-related illnesses here in Michigan," and added that, "Workers in service industries shouldn't be forced to choose between their health and their job."

Quoted In:

Mason, S., "Civic group: Smoking ban hurts business," Hometownlife.com, May 11, 2008.


Tom George, Michigan Senator

"Thousands of Michigan residents have their health placed at risk through exposure to secondhand smoke." The smokefree law "is consistent with our constitutional duty to protect the health of the citizens of Michigan."

Quoted In:

Luke, P., "Public smoking nears its last gasp," Grand Rapids Press, May 9, 2008.


Joel Johnson, Nebraska Senator

Regarding a smokefree measure: "This is perhaps the most significant thing we could do to increase the quality of health of all Nebraskans."

Quoted In:

Jenkins, N., "Heineman signs smoking ban," Journal Star, February 26, 2008.


Staci Appel, Iowa State Senator

"Ladies and Gentlemen of the Senate, I stand before you today a firm believer that the Smokefree Air Act is one of the best public health initiatives in Iowa history. As our surrounding states pass legislation creating smoke-free environments in all public places and areas of work, we as Iowans cannot neglect the opportunity to protect the health of every citizen in our own state. This bill is not a divisive tool for discriminating against those who choose to smoke, but an avenue to a healthier Iowa. 4,500 Iowans perish each year as a result of smoking-related illnesses, of which the American Cancer Society estimates 440 to be non-smokers. Thus, the members of this Senate must act courageously for the state to see beneficial change. I commend the efforts of the 56 members of the House who took the first step toward banning smoking in most public places; a step which health experts agree will significantly improve the health of Iowans. More than 100,000 Iowans earn a living in the food service industry, and these citizens have a 50 percent greater chance of dying from lung cancer. Some suggest these 100,000 people can simply seek other jobs if they don’t wish to inhale second-hand smoke while they work. But no Iowan should risk unemployment because they fear the 63 cancer-causing chemicals in secondhand smoke. What kind of Iowan leaders are we if we elect to sit back and pretend our friends, neighbors and family members are suffering each day? This is preventable. And as we have all been elected to protect the best interests of our citizens, this can be simple."

Quoted In:

Appel, S., "Sen. Appel: opening statement on the Smokefree Air Act," Iowapolitics.com, February 28, 2008.


Jim Doyle, Wisconsin Governor

"We know which way history is going. The Legislature should act so that Wisconsin does not become the ashtray of the Midwest."

Quoted In:

Forster, S., "9,000 smokers called quit line in first week," Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, January 9, 2008.


Timothy M. Kaine, Virginia Governor

"The scientific evidence on the health risks associated with exposure to secondhand smoke is clear and convincing. Recognizing the negative health effects and high public costs of secondhand smoke, Virginia must act to protect the workers and consumers in its restaurants."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Smoke free restaurants," Virginia.gov, [January 7, 2008].


James Speck, Ecru, Mississippi, Alderman

"There's an obligation on the part of the public to protect those who can't protect themselves. I'd like to go on the record as one of the first small towns in Mississippi to have a smoking ordinance."

Quoted In:

Castens, E., "Ecru latest to pass ban on smoking," Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal, January 4, 2008.


Paul Thompson, Ecru, Mississippi, Alderman

"If you can contain your smoke, I could care less whether you smoke, but you can't do that, and your rights end where my rights begin. This is going to protect those that don't smoke."

Quoted In:

Castens, E., "Ecru latest to pass ban on smoking," Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal, January 4, 2008.


Karl Skala, Columbia, Missouri, City Councilman

"I agree with the mayor on this regard; there are proven problems with secondhand smoke. It is the first business of the government to protect the health of the people. It is incumbent on the government to protect those who don't smoke."

Quoted In:

Pressley, G., "Columbia dining tax revenues dissipate with smoking ban, report says," Columbia Missourian, December 12, 2007.


Darwin Hindman, Mayor, Columbia, MO

"To me, the important thing is we’re charged as a government with the health and welfare of the community. And where you have a conduct that is known without any question to cause harm to other people, including patrons and employees, that trumps the economic factor."

Quoted In:

Hughes, K., "Study: smoking ban hurts sales -- Federal Reserve report cites 5 percent decline," Columbia Tribune, December 12, 2007.


Jim Rowland, Former Kansas City Councilman

"You have to keep in mind that whole countries, states and large cities are smoke-free. Cities like Boston and New York have had zero economic impact, which is always the biggest argument from restaurants and bars. These are cities with thriving entertainment and restaurant industries. Last time I checked, New York is still standing. I think it’s a bogus argument. ... The surgeon general came out with a report in 2006 that proved there is no safe level of secondhand smoke. There are thousands of workers in jeopardy by allowing smoking in restaurants and bars. It’s a workplace safety issue."

Quoted In:

Bamforth, K., "Voters to decide smoke-free ordinance in '08," Wednesday Sun KCCommunityNews.com, December 12, 2007.


John Wilkinson, Snowmass Village, CO, Town Councilman

"Some 3,800 people will die next year due to secondhand smoke. Smoking is not a protected freedom."

Quoted In:

Agar, C., "Snowmass snuffs out smoking: Town Council OKs ban," Aspen Times, November 6, 2007.


Brian Johnson, Kalamazoo County, MI, Commissioner

Regarding a smokefree government buildings ordinance: The county is the public-health enforcer in the community. I think our own house needs to be healthy first."

Quoted In:

Ricks, C., "Close vote expands county smoking ban," Kalamazoo Gazette, November 7, 2007.


Phil Andrews, Montgomery County Councilmember, MD

"Thousands of restaurant workers and hundreds of thousands of diners have benefited from the measure, which protects them from exposure to carcinogenic second-hand smoke. There will be no going back to the time of smokefilled bars and restaurants. ... Not only have sales at existing restaurants continued to rise over the past four years, but many new restaurants have opened during this period throughout the County. The law is working exactly as intended, protecting restaurant workers and diners at no cost to taxpayers. Enforcement is not an issue, because of the law's strong public support."

Quoted In:

Spivack, M., "MoCo smoking ban praised on anniversary," Maryland Moment, October 10, 2007.


Isiah Leggett, Montgomery County, Maryland, Executive

Regarding the county's smokefree ordinance, Leggett stated that he was "proud that Montgomery County has led the way in protecting the health of restaurant workers and patrons."

Quoted In:

Spivack, M., "MoCo smoking ban praised on anniversary," Maryland Moment, October 10, 2007.


John Adler, New Jersey Senator

"The casino industry's doom and gloom forecast that the smoking ban will kill business is over-hyped. In reality, more people will come to Atlantic City when they realize they can leave without smelling like an ashtray."

Quoted In:

Associated Press, "Most AC casinos: 7 the hard way for smokers at AC casinos," CNN, September 17, 2007.


Coralin Feierbach, Mayor, Belmont, CA

"The right of the people to breathe fresh air supersedes the right of the smoker."

Quoted In:

Oremus, W., "Belmont passes tough anti-smoking law," San Jose Mercury News, September 12, 2007.


Jay Bradford, Former Arkansas Representative

Regarding a smokefree hospitals law that he sponsored: “Hospitals have to be a clean environment. There is no doubt that secondhand smoke is dangerous to the members of the public. There is not any doubt it is a terrific health hazard. It’s their right to smoke, but it’s not their right to do damage to other people.”

Quoted In:

Bromley, S., "Law has hospital-zone smokers hitting the streets to light up," Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, September 2, 2007.


Pat Evans, Mayor, Plano, TX

On a request to delay implementation of a smokefree ordinance, Evans stated, "I can’t personally do that, because I think our job is to protect the health, safety and welfare of the citizens of Plano. No one has the right to endanger anyone else’s health and safety.”

Quoted In:

Hixson, J., "Council plans to stick with smoking ordinance," Courier-Gazette, August 15, 2007.


Brian Collins, Health Director, Plano, TX

"This ordinance is not about bars, and it is not about the restaurants. It is about public health and the employees that work in these restaurants and bars. I find it difficult to equate someone’s health with loss in revenue."

Quoted In:

Hixson, J., "Council plans to stick with smoking ordinance," Courier-Gazette, August 15, 2007.


Wendy Davis, Fort Worth, Texas, City Council member

"I don’t feel there should be a freedom to compromise public health."

Quoted In:

Lee, M., "Fort Worth council passes smoking restrictions," Fort Worth Star-Telegram, August 21, 2007.


Loretta Ellerbe, City Council member, Plano, TX

"For me, it is a public health issue. Most of the arguments I have heard from people in favor of smoking have said you don’t have to go into the restaurants if you don’t want to. That is true. But, I think we need to consider the employees."

Quoted In:

Hixson, J., "Smoking ban battle brewing on city council horizon," Allen American, August 8, 2007.


Pat Evans, Mayor, Plano, TX

"I really hope they don’t try to overturn the ordinance. I just want people to really think about it before they turn our city into an unhealthy oasis for smokers. They don’t have the right to ruin people’s health, and that includes the employees."

Quoted In:

Hixson, J., "Smoking ban battle brewing on city council horizon," Allen American, August 8, 2007.


Pat Northey, Volusia County Council member, FL

With regard to a smokefree playgrounds ordinance: "I think people are tired of dealing with secondhand smoke. Most people don't want to be exposed to secondhand smoke, and they don't want their children exposed to secondhand smoke."

Quoted In:

Show, C., "Volusia restricts smoking in parks: other counties and cities also are seeking ways to ban cigarettes from playgrounds," Orlando Sentinel, Orlando Sentinel.


Joseph Vitale, New Jersey Senator

"Thousands of workers each and every day are exposed to second-hand smoke. Why should thousands of casino workers be subject to cancer and emphysema?"

Quoted In:

McAleer, P., "Full ban on casino smoking approved by Senate," Press of Atlantic City, June 22, 2007.


John Adler, New Jersey Senator

"We're doing the right thing for public health. It's overdue. A year and a half late, but better late than not at all."

Quoted In:

McAleer, P., "Full ban on casino smoking approved by Senate," Press of Atlantic City, June 22, 2007.


Rod Blagojevich, Illinois Governor

"This law will save lives. The realities are that smoking kills people. . . .My only regret is that this took so long."

Quoted In:

Mendell, D. Kimberly, J., "Governor signs statewide smoking ban," Chicago Tribune, July 23, 2007.


Vince Meconi, Secretary, Delaware Department of Health and Social Services

"As the guardian of Delaware's public health, it is our turn to take the lead in the movement to prohibit smoking in the workplace. As we see it, condoning tobacco use anywhere on our hospital properties sends the wrong message about a deadly product."

Quoted In:

Allen, R., "Smokers balk at toughened ban at state hospitals: outdoor areas to be eliminated Nov. 15,," News Journal, July 18, 2007.


Sonny Posey, Mayor, Jasper, Alabama

"We think we owe it, as a government to our citizens, and especially to the children, to see that the environment we
provide for them is as clean, healthy and wholesome as it can be."

Quoted In:

White, L., "Jasper bans smoking in city parks, playgrounds," NBC 13, July 18, 2007.


Ed Rendell, Pennsylvania Governor

On a preemptive clean indoor air measure passed by the state Senate: "I would rather veto the bill and have no bill at all than have a bill that is so compromised."

Quoted In:

Levy, M., "Pa. Senate votes for smoking ban, without health groups' support," Philadelphia Daily News, June 27, 2007.


Ginny Burdick, Oregon Senator

"If second-hand smoke were any other pollutant, it would have been banned years ago."

Quoted In:

Wong, P., "Governor signs smoking-ban, child-safety-seat measures," Statesman Journal, Statesman Journal.


John Lynch, New Hampshire Governor

"The science is clear -- second-hand smoke poses a dangerous health risk, and that is why this new law is so important. Smoking is banned in almost every other workplace in New Hampshire. We should not continue to subject our hard-working citizens in the restaurant industry to the harmful dangers of second-hand smoke."

Quoted In:

Love, N., "N.H. bans smoking in bars, restaurants," Boston Globe, June 19, 2007.


David Gottesman, New Hampshire Senator

"Our workers deserve to have a safe working environment."

Quoted In:

Love, N., "N.H. bans smoking in bars, restaurants," Boston Globe, June 19, 2007.


Paul Smedberg, Alexandria, Virginia, City Council member

"Sometimes local jurisdictions have to push the envelope. The country is heading this way. Virginia could be the last state to enact a smoking ban."

Quoted In:

Downey, K., "City moves to ban restaurant smoking," Washington Post: C05, June 17, 2007.


Ludwig P. Gaines, Alexandria, Virginia, City Council member

"It's important to protect the health of our constituents."

Quoted In:

Downey, K., "City moves to ban restaurant smoking," Washington Post: C05, June 17, 2007.


Kathy Sheran, Minnesota Senator

"Those who have served us ... are now among the rest of the workers who are protected from the hazards of secondhand smoke."

Quoted In:

Brunswick, M., "Votes put smoking ban in the governor’s hands," Star Tribune, May 12, 2007.


Ron Latz, Minnesota Senator

"No worker's health is less valuable than anyone else's, no worker's life is less valuable than anyone else's. Small business should be excited about this small step to help reduce costs on their bottom line."

Quoted In:

Brunswick, M., "Votes put smoking ban in the governor’s hands," Star Tribune, May 12, 2007.


Tom Huntley, Minnesota Representative

"It will protect workers. It will be a giant step forward for the state of Minnesota."

Quoted In:

Brunswick, M., "Votes put smoking ban in the governor’s hands," Star Tribune, May 12, 2007.


Phil Bredeson, Tennessee Governor

"CHART and its partner organizations have taken a strong leadership role in raising awareness about this issue, and I thank them for their continued support. I also appreciate the strong bipartisan support this measure is receiving in both the House and the Senate. Every Tennessean deserves the right to go to work, to earn a paycheck, to eat a meal, and to provide for their families without risking their health in the process. I hope the legislative committees looking at this issue will agree this is the right thing to do, and the right time to do it."

Quoted In:

Bredeson, P., "Statement from Governor Phil Bredeson on May 9 press conference to support smoke-free workplaces," [Tennessee Governor's Office], May 9, 2007.


Jeff Slavik, Mayor, Westville, IL

"It will be good practice for us. In seven months, it will probably be state law, anyway."

Quoted In:

Toole, D., "Westville bans smoking in village-owned buildings, vehicles," News-Gazette, May 9, 2007.


Bill Richardson, New Mexico Governor

Regarding a smokefree law that he signed, Richardson called it "good public health policy" and "the right thing to do." Richardson added, "More importantly, the advantages of a law like this dramatically reducing exposure to second-hand smoke...far outweigh any potential administrative problems."

Quoted In:

Nash, K., "Smoke ban 'right thing to do,' says guv," Albuquerque Tribune, March 14, 2007


Sheila Dixon, Mayor, Baltimore, MD

"The City Council has decided that no worker should have to choose between health and employment. Reducing our exposure to secondhand smoke means less heart disease, less lung disease and fewer premature births."

Quoted In:

Fritze, J., "Next task: enforcing smoke ban — city Health Dept. must grapple with law's exemption language," Baltimore Sun, February 28, 2007.


Tony Lourey, Minneosota state Senator

Loury indicated that allowing local governments to adopt stricter smokefree ordinances than state law is important, especially since two local governments in his district – Carlton County and Cloquet – have tougher ordinances: "I could not go home to these folks and tell them I preempted their local ordinances."

Quoted In:

Davis, D., "Smoke ban plan restored to near its original form: Senate panel removes provisions," Forum, February 27, 2007.


Robert W. Curran, Baltimore, MD, City Council Vice President

On the passage of a smokefree ordinance: "This is a historic night in this chamber and for our city. Lives will be saved."

Quoted In:

Fritze, J., "Smoking ban wins approval: nine on council back law to take effect Jan. 1; momentum for state bill grows," Baltimore Sun, February 27, 2007.


Paula Johnson Branch, Baltimore, MD, City Council member

"Second-hand smoke is a public health hazard, legal or not."

Quoted In:

Fritze, J., "Smoking ban wins approval: nine on council back law to take effect Jan. 1; momentum for state bill grows," Baltimore Sun, February 27, 2007.


Thomas V. Mike Miller, Maryland Senate President

"I think the time has come. It's a health issue. It's a quality of life issue."

Quoted In:

Fritze, J., "Smoking ban wins approval: nine on council back law to take effect Jan. 1; momentum for state bill grows," Baltimore Sun, February 27, 2007.


Robert J. Garagiola, Maryland Senator

"It's great that the city [Baltimore] is taking a leadership role, and we're hopeful that this provides additional momentum to pass a statewide ban."

Quoted In:

Fritze, J., "Smoking ban wins approval: nine on council back law to take effect Jan. 1; momentum for state bill grows," Baltimore Sun, February 27, 2007.


Joseph Vitale, New Jersey Senator

"Surely, the powerful and creative minds who built the colossal monuments of the gambling industry in Atlantic City can conjure up ways to keep luring people to casinos without killing the help."

Quoted In:

Hester, Jr., T., "Complete casino smoking ban sought by senators," Associated Press, February 21, 2007.


Mike Forsman, County Commissioner, St. Louis County, Minnesota

"One principal of this (ordinance) is that people should not be forced to breathe other people’s secondhand smoke."

Quoted In:

Strauss, K., "County board moves smoking ban forward," Timberjay 18(7), February 16, 2007.


Tony Rand, North Carolina Senate Majority Leader

On a measure to repeal preemption: "It allows cities to set their own rules. I think this is something that towns ought to control. One size does not fit all."

Quoted In:

Fuquay, J., "Bills to test smoking tolerance," Fayetteville Observer, February 15, 2007.


Joel Johnson, Nebraska state Senator

"It's one thing to overeat, it's one thing to compete in dangerous sports and so on. The difference here is what you do with your actions doesn't stop with you. Secondhand smoke hurts the other guy."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Legislature, G.I. city council debate smoking ban," Grand Island Independent, February 14, 2007.


Nancy Vance, Alderman, Batavia, Illinois

"There should be no doubt to the council that smoking is a health hazard and that secondhand smoke is a health hazard. Public safety will always trump economic gain."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Batavia committee rejects smoking ban: ban would affect Batavia, St. Charles and Geneva," CBS, February 7, 2007.


Richard D. Greene, Mayor, Bangor, ME

"I've heard people say it's the smoke police or the Gestapo. I think it boils down to common sense: smoking is not good for you. Certainly if you have young children who are in the process of developing and growing, it's even worse for them. You wouldn't say, 'Hey, here's a bottle of mercury. Go bob it around.'"

Quoted In:

Belluck, P., "Maine city bans smoking in cars with children," New York Times, January 19, 2007.


Rep. Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the House, U.S. House of Representatives

"The days for smoke-filled rooms in the United States Capitol are over. I am a firm believer that Congress should lead by example. Effective immediately, smoking will no longer be permitted in the Speaker's Lobby."

Quoted In:

McCormack, K., "Pelosi bans smoking in Speaker's Lobby," The Hill, January 10, 2007.


Adrian Fenty, Mayor-elect, District of Columbia

"We really painstakingly reviewed every city, especially major cities, that enacted a smoking ban, and there was no evidence whatsoever that enacting a smoking ban sends business elsewhere."

Quoted In:

Zongker, B., "Washington D.C. snuffs smoking," DC Examiner, January 1, 2007.


Kyle Foust, Chairman, Erie County Council, NY

"As the ban has been debated, many have also forgotten who the ordinance was originally designed to protect: employees. Employees don't have a choice to leave a bar, tavern or restaurant when they're working. Nonsmoking sections don't adequately protect workers or patrons. Smoke cannot be contained by an artificial barrier. Even if smoke doesn't bother someone immediately, there are still long-term consequences of breathing secondhand smoke. There is plenty of credible evidence that this can be just as bad as (or worse than) smoking itself. Telling employees that they have to find a new job because the smoke bothers or harms them doesn't seem to be a very realistic or healthy option. While the debate has centered on drinking establishments, the ban would benefit all workers, whether they work in an office, a machine shop, a law office or service industry. ... I am no antismoking zealot, wishing to purge all of the ills of tobacco from the face of the earth. But I do believe that when the interests of smokers, who willingly choose to smoke, and nonsmokers, who make the conscious choice to lead a healthy lifestyle, collide, we must act to protect those who choose not to smoke."

Quoted In:

Foust, K., "Pennsylvania's actually behind ban curve," Erie (PA) Times-News, December 15, 2006.


Dr. Fred Jacobs, New Jersey State Health Commissioner

"I have seen firsthand (in medical practice) in hundreds of patients what tobacco and secondhand smoke can do to the human body. Because secondhand smoke has such an impact on workers, I believe all workers deserve protection. To try and argue that the health of the people who work in the casinos and the patrons of the casinos is not as important as their profits is not a winning argument. Now that the data are here, you have casino workers all over the city saying, ‘I don't want to work in this toxic soup.' It is the employer's responsibility to provide a safe workplace. If the state has to make them do it, we'll be happy to."

Quoted In:

Rose, E., "State health commissioner backs Atlantic City plan for casino smoking ban," Press of Atlantic City, November 29, 2006.


Coralin Feierbach, Mayor, Belmont, CA

"People don't have a right to blow smoke in people's surroundings. What rights do people have to smoke when secondhand smoke is carcinogenic?''

Quoted In:

Pakula, K., "Smoking ban plan stirs rage: furious e-mails deluge City Council after tough curbs are announced," MediaNews, December 5, 2006.


G. Bruce Ward, Council member, Atlantic City Council, NJ

Regarding an ordinance to make casinos smokefree: “Evidence from the surgeon general of the United States indicates that there is no acceptable level of second hand smoke. We feel that this exception is discriminatory against our workforce, our neighbors and we want to close this loophole."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "A.C. councilmen pushing for casino smoking ban," CBS 3, November 2, 2006.


Todd Campbell, Mayor, Burbank, CA

"I was in Austin and Las Vegas today - walking through a public area where there's secondhand smoke. Not only is there a nuisance, it's a risk. I understand some folks are very touchy about this issue; that they, of course, want to preserve their rights. But the thing we actually forget about is you -- smokers -- are actually infringing on others' rights to a clean environment."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Burbank officials consider nunicipal smoking ban," nbc4.tv, October 30, 2006.


Roy Schmidt, Grand Rapids, Michigan, City Commissioner

"It's a tough call, I don't like telling people what to do. This is the right thing to do. Nobody has the right to blow smoke in other people's faces."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "City commissioners approve smoking ban ordinance," Grand Rapids Press, October 17, 2006.


Darwin Hindman, Mayor, Columbia, MO

"The impacts on health are significant. It affects a tremendous number of people in a tremendous number of ways. As far as I can see, the only way to eliminate that health concern is to eliminate that secondhand smoke."

Quoted In:

LeBlanc, M., "Columbia smoking ban passes," Columbia Daily Tribune, October 10, 2006.


Federal Glover, Contra Costa County, California, Supervisor

With regard to a smokefree outdoor public places ordinance: "Once again Contra Costa County is showing its leadership when it comes to the health of its residents."

Quoted In:

Huff, R., "Supervisors limit outdoor smoking: Contra Costa County Board votes to ban smoking in many public, unincorporated areas," Contra Costa Times, October 11, 2006.


Steve Gilmore, Mayor, Ashland, KY

On the passage of a comprehensive smokefree ordinance: "I think we were certainly unanimous in that we felt it was a health issue. ... I’m proud of the commission. It’s a positive, progressive move."

Quoted In:

Kirschner, C., "City will go smoke-free," Daily Independent, August 25, 2006.


Tim Kant, Mayor, Fairhope, AL

"I am thrilled that the council went forward with this to protect the citizens of Fairhope. The only way I can see us getting control of health costs is to try and get a healthy community."

Quoted In:

Perry, M., "Fairhope snuffs out smoking: city becomes the second in Baldwin County to restrict tobacco use," Mobile Press-Register, August 16, 2006.


Ernie Fletcher, Kentucky Governor

"This is an unprecedented step toward creating a healthier work environment for thousands of our state employees and those that are visiting our state office buildings. It sends a message to all Kentuckians about the risk of secondhand smoke."

Quoted In:

Gerth, J., "State buildings to go smoke-free: Fletcher signs order; not all will be affected," Louisville Courier-Journal, July 12, 2006.


Linda Lingle, Hawaii Governor

"It was not long ago when we believed that non-smoking sections in restaurants or on airplanes were sufficient to keep second-hand smoke away from nonsmokers. We now have concrete research about the serious dangers of secondhand smoke. We also know that tobacco is a leading cause of preventable death in Hawaii, therefore, it is critical that we do all we can to protect the health of our residents and visitors by providing public venues that are truly smoke-free. Hawaii’s new smoke-free law will save lives. At the same time, we will continue to work with our community and health care partners to focus on preventing Hawaii youth from starting smoking."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Hawaii Governor approves smoking ban law," Hawaii Reporter, July 10, 2006.


Rod Blagojevich, Illinois Governor

On signing a bill granting counties the authority to enact smokefree regulations: "This law puts the decision about whether to ban smoking in public places in the hands of local government. It gives people the ability to decide what’s best for their communities."

Quoted In:

Erickson, K., "New law gives Illinois counties power to ban public smoking," Quad City Times, June 27, 2006.


Don Arena, Red Fox Steakhouse, Lincoln, NE

Arena noted that his business has increased 20 percent since a smokefree ordinance, which he opposed, took effect: "I realized the difference myself in the atmosphere. Secondly, a lot of people who were afraid of smoke started coming out. What happened was quite the opposite of what I felt."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Lincoln restaurant reports more sales since smoking ban: owner who fought ban notices higher revenue," KTEV, June 21, 2006.


Michael Nutter, City Council member, Philadelphia, PA City Council

"Philadelphia will no longer be considered the country's ashtray."

Quoted In:

Matheson, K., "City Council approves smoking ban in Philadelphia," Phillyburbs.com, June 15, 2006.


Gary Fuller, Mayor, Opelika, Alabama

"I’m proud of Opelika for being the first city in this part of the state to enact a strong nonsmoking ordinance. I commend the City Council for making it effective right away. We’ll be a better community — and healthier, too — because of this proactive position."

Quoted In:

Perry, A., "Opelika passes new smoking ban in public buildings," Auburn Plainsman, June 8, 2006.


Jerry Rindone, Chula Vista, CA City Councilman

"If you are a nonsmoker, you have a right to be in any part of that restaurant without having to choke, breathing in secondhand smoke."

Quoted In:

Mannes, T., "Chula Vista to forbid smoking on restaurant patios," San Diego Union-Tribune, May 26, 2006.


Ken Pirok, Champaign, IL, City Councilman

Pirok, initially a supporter only of smokefree restaurants, stated that arguments against smokefree bars were "not very compelling." Pirok added, "This is not about the rights of business owners and smokers, this is about the rights of nonsmokers. When you think about it in those terms, the smoking ban makes sense."

Quoted In:

Associated Press, "Champaign city council votes to ban smoking in bars and restaurants," Belleview News-Democrat, May 16, 2006.


Henry Fishburne, Charleston, South Carolina, City Councilman

Fishburne addressed the Sullivan's Island Town Council, which had voted in favor of a smokefree ordinance, and stated, "Thank you for having the courage to do this."

Quoted In:

Walker, T., "Sullivan's Island passes area's 1st smoking ban: ordinance takes effect in June, affecting workplaces, including restaurants, bars," Post and Courier, May 17, 2006.


Al Snellgrove, Former Luverne, Alabama City Councilman

Regarding his support for a smokefree ordinance: "It just got very difficult to enjoy a meal, and then you hear it from people at church, school and on the street."

Quoted In:

Associated Press, "From Pine Bluff to Timnath, small-town America joins the no-smoking trend," North County Times, April 18, 2006.



Carroll Smith, Judge-Executive, Letcher County, Kentucky, Fiscal Court

Regarding his support of a smokefree ordinance: "I would guess I've alienated some people, but I think it's a public health issue, and part of my duties is to protect the public."

Quoted In:

Mueller, L., "Smoking ban approved in Letcher County," Lexington Herald-Leader, April 12, 2006.


Mike Huckabee, Arkansas Governor

"This is not a bill against smokers, and I want to make that clear. This is a bill for people who, for their own reasons, whether it's health, or just personal, choose not to smoke. ... This was a vote for the majority of those who have suffered in silence, choked in silence, coughed in silence and taken medication to overcome the effects all those years in silence."

Quoted In:

Sadler, A., "Governor signs smoking ban legislation," Arkansas News Bureau, April 8, 2006.


Barry Groveman, Mayor, Calabasas, California

"This is clearly a groundbreaking public health law. This is the right time and the right place to take this step. We hope it will be the way things are done all over the country and all around the world."

Quoted In:

Broder, J., "Smoking ban takes effect, indoors and out," New York Times, March 19, 2006.



Shawn Womack, Arkansas Senate Minority Leader

"Employees ought to be protected from the toxic chemicals we now know are produced by smoking. Second-hand smoke is also a health hazard. It is along the same lines of protecting employees from asbestos and other hazards in the workplace."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Arkansans support smoke-free legislation," Angus Reid Consultants, April 2, 2006.


Mike Huckabee, Arkansas Governor

"We have a responsibility to protect the innocent people. And not at the expense of innocent people should people be allowed to pursue a personal habit."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Arkansans support smoke-free legislation," Angus Reid Consultants, April 2, 2006.


Barry Groveman, Mayor, Calabasas, California

"The question for us begins with one important premise: Do we accept the mountain of evidence that irrefutably suggests that secondhand smoke causes serious injury and death? If we accept that, then this is a very legitimate public health law. Nobody has a right to do something that harms somebody else."

Quoted In:

Glenn, S., "Sorry, you can't smoke out here: some cities pondering outdoor smoking bans," San Bernardino County Sun, April 3, 2006.


Mike Huckabee, Arkansas Governor

"There's no health benefit whatsoever to second-hand tobacco smoke, and there is irrefutable evidence that second-hand smoke is in fact a toxic harmful substance."

Quoted In:

Munoz, C., "Huckabee make plans to reduce second hand smoke in Arkansas," KATV, March 22, 2006.


Mike Huckabee, Arkansas Governor

"This is not about taking away the rights of smokers to smoke. It is, however, without any apology, to make it for a safe clean-air work place for people who don't have a choice -- who go to work and are subjected to somebody else's smoke."

Quoted In:

Munoz, C., "Huckabee outlines proposals for a special session," KATV, March 22, 2006.


Mike Huckabee, Arksansa Governor

Dear Legislator:

A lot of activity is going on in regards to a possible special session and I wanted to communicate with you about some perspectives and ask for your input. I hope to schedule a conference call within the next week to give a brief update and take questions you might have. ...

I will be asking you to do something for every worker in Arkansas in addition to increasing their hourly wage and that is increasing their likelihood for a longer life by guaranteeing every employee in the workplace a place to work with clean air, free from the second hand tobacco smoke that is irrefutably harmful to innocent bystanders. This doesn't infringe upon a smoker's right, but rather puts the focus where it should be--a WORKER'S RIGHT to have a clean and safe place to work.

Quoted In:

Huckabee, M., "[Excerpts from a letter to legislators, reprinted in: The governor speaks and it's worth reading]," Arkansas Daily Blog via Arkansas Times, March 22, 2006.


Lou D'Allesandro, New Hampshire Senator

With regard to a smokefree bill: "We are the live free or die state, but we'd like to prevent that 'die.'"

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "House prepares for vote on smoking ban," TheWMURChannel.com, March 8, 2006.


Chris Coleman, Mayor, Saint Paul, MN

"We know that secondhand smoke is the third leading cause of preventable death in the United States and is a leading cause of heart disease, cancer and respiratory disease. It would be wrong to stand back and do nothing."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "St. Paul goes smoke-free," KARE 11, February 23, 2006.


John Callahan, Mayor, Bethlehem, PA

''I think it's a very positive sign for one of our leading restaurants on Restaurant Row to become totally smoke-free. It is a good policy for work sites to provide a smoke-free environment for both their employees and their patrons.''

Quoted In:

Radzievich, N., "Bethlehem eatery latest to ban smoking," Morning Call, February 14, 2006.


Todd Rutherford, South Carolina Representative, D-Columbia

Regarding a clean indoor air bill under consideration: "It's time we stop ignoring the reality that cigarette smoke in an enclosed environment is toxic. At a certain point, we have to stop fooling ourselves. It's about cancer. It's about dying. It's about someone's right to clean air."

Quoted In:

Adcox, S., "House subcommittee discusses smoking ban," Beaufort Gazette, February 16, 2006.


Ira Ruben, President Pro Tem, Maryland Senate

"Montgomery County has proved that a smoke-free policy does not harm restaurant or bar business. In fact, once restaurants become smoke-free, families with children, pregnant women, seniors, and individuals with respiratory diseases and allergies who often avoid public venues where smoking is allowed can become a new customer base. ... With the passage of the Maryland Clean Indoor Air Act, people of all ages and health conditions will be able to enjoy the restaurant or drinking establishment of their choice anywhere in the state. Most important, restaurant, bar and entertainment workers no longer will be treated as second-class citizens by being forced to choose between their health and their job."

Quoted In:

Ruben, I., "Smoke-free is a winner for Maryland," Washington Post: B08, February 12, 2006.


Barry Groveman, Mayor, Calabasas, California

"There is a clean-air god, and he or she smiled on Calabasas. I'm going to call on all my fellow mayors to do the same thing. Now that California has taken this step, why should people have to wait two or three years when cities can do it so much more quickly?"

Quoted In:

Wilson, J., "Tobacco foes see an opening: secondhand smoke's designation as a toxic contaminant gives politicians and activists extra ammunition for more restrictions," Los Angeles Times, February 6, 2006.


Jean Hunhoff, Representative, South Dakota

In regard to her support of a bill that would grant municipalities the right to enact smoking ordinance stricter than state law: "Local control allows a community to decide what they want for the community."

Quoted In:

Associated Press, "Local government could regulate tobacco," Sioux City Journal, January 31, 2006.


Ed Smith, Alderman, Chicago, IL

"Am I proud? I am proud that we are going to save a lot of lives with this ban."

Quoted In:

Kogan, R., "City's stepchild," Chicago Tribune, January 22, 2006.


Richard Codey, Governor, New Jersey

Regarding his signing of a smokefree bill: "After nearly 10 years of debate, public health has won a major battle in Trenton. In 10 or 20 years, people will look back and thank us for having the courage to do this now. In the long run, these laws will save lives, plain and simple."

Quoted In:

Kadish, M., "Codey: Public health has won battle," Trentonian, January 16, 2005.


Connie Sprynczynatyk, City Commissioner, Bismarck, ND

Regarding a request by the North Dakota Hospitality Association to review the city's smokefree ordinance: "You're under the presumption that if we reconsider we'll look at adding something back in. Actually it could be more stringent. It's my preference to have all facilities be nonsmoking, including bars. That's where I stand."

Quoted In:

Weixel, G., "City revisits effects of ban," Bismarck Tribune, December 14, 2005.


Odell Key, Mayor, Gibsland, LA

Regarding the passage of a smokefree ordinance: "Everybody was cool about it."

Quoted In:

Welborn, V., "Gibsland becomes smallest municipality to go smoke-free," Shreveport Times, December 15, 2005


Paul Zerby, Former Minneapolis, MN City Council member

Regarding a smokefree ordinance he co-authored: "I really believe we will actually save some lives and make some lives better."

Quoted In:

Stratton, J., "Retiring Downtown Councilmember Paul Zerby reflects on his tenure," Downtown Journal / Skyway News, December 15, 2005.


Gordon Mowrer, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, City Councilman

Mowrer urged that "some major kinds of steps" be taken to make public places in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania smokefree. Mowrer is aware that state law preempts local smokefree ordinances and said, "What I'm trying to say to the health department is the No. 1 health problem right now is smoking. Let's be creative. If the state says you can't do it one way, then you go the other way. There's always another way to do anything."

Quoted In:

Bresswein, K., "Smokeless Bethlehem councilman's crusade," Express-Times, December 5, 2005.


Bruce Strom, Alderman, Springfield, IL

"The public wants this ordinance voted up or down ... on its merits without adding exceptions to it. The mayor and the aldermen have an opportunity to demonstrate community leadership by allowing this to happen."

Quoted In:

Wetterich, C., "Ex-mayors: ban smoking," State Journal-Register, December 3, 2005.


Bruce Strom, Springfield, Illinois, Alderman

"The ordinance is about the health of employees and the health of members of the public who use such facilities."

Quoted In:

Wetterich, C., "Strom to push ban on indoor smoking," State Journal-Register, August 12, 2005.


Dr. Enrico Garcia, Health Commissioner, Vigo County, Indiana

"Financially, I don't think it will have a negative effect on business. And there's no price tag for a person's life. One life lost is one life too much."

Quoted In:

Bennett, M., "Seeking quality control: Vigo County Health Commissioner Dr. Enrico Garcia continues to push for an indoor clean-air ordinance to bring a better quality of life to the whole community," Tribune-Star, November 8, 2005.


John Clark, Greenfield, Indiana City Councilman

"As far as smokers having rights, I hold the belief that it's the same as throwing a punch. You can throw all the punches you want, but as soon as you hit somebody, then that's something different."

Quoted In:

Bennett, M., "Seeking quality control: Vigo County Health Commissioner Dr. Enrico Garcia continues to push for an indoor clean-air ordinance to bring a better quality of life to the whole community," Tribune-Star, November 8, 2005.


James Robey, Howard County, Maryland, Executive

"I just can't wait any longer to ban smoking. Too many lives are at stake."

Quoted In:

Associated Press, "Third county proposes smoking ban For bars, restaurants," WBALTV, October 26, 2005.


Chris Harter, President, Levy Restaurants

"When large cities have gone non-smoking, we've seen no impact other than healthier guests and team members."

Quoted In:

Bergen, K., "Mom and pop bars could get smoking-ban break," Chicago Tribune, October 27, 2005.


Jim Brainard, Mayor, Carmel, IN

"All society pays the cost of people who get cancer and other diseases from breathing secondhand smoke. We just think it's a quality-of-life issue and an economic issue."

Quoted In:

Rogers Barrett, L., "Carmel to consider ban on smoking like Indy's," Indianapolis Star, October 15, 2005.


David R. Gifford, Director, Rhode Island Department of Health

"This has really been an absolute win-win for Rhode Island. We have not seen the drastic horror stories we heard when the legislation was going into effect."

Quoted In:

Henry, R., "Health department says smoking ban helps business," Associated Press, October 4, 2005.


Vincent B. Orange Sr., District of Columbia City Council Member

Regarding his support for a smokefree ordinance: "Nobody should have to choose between a job and good health. Nonsmoking bar and restaurant workers have a 30 percent higher risk of lung cancer than all other nonsmokers. We need to reduce that number by enacting a comprehensive smoke-free workplace law."

Quoted In:

Redding, Jr., R., "Orange backs anti-tobacco bill," Washington Times, September 22, 2005.


Howard Heideman, St. Clair County, Michigan, Commissioner

However, as we consider the rising cost of health care and our knowledge about the effects of secondhand smoke on the health of nonsmokers, I believe it is time to think about a statewide ban on smoking in restaurants and the workplace. Every day, thousands of Michigan workers, children and families are facing harmful chemicals where they work and when they eat out due to exposure to secondhand smoke. This is unacceptable and must end. ... Smoke-free public places are necessary for the promotion and protection of public health. For more than 30 years, scientific evidence has confirmed cigarette smoke contains many harmful chemicals (such as arsenic, formaldehyde and lead) and can cause serious and life-threatening diseases and accounts for about 3,000 lung-cancer deaths annually in U.S. nonsmokers. All workers have the right to breathe smoke-free air. Just as workers are protected from other unsafe substances and conditions while on the job, they deserve protection from the harmful effects of secondhand smoke. A 2004 study published by the British Medical Journal found exposure to secondhand smoke increases the risk of heart disease among nonsmokers by as much as 60%. Our children have the same right. The Environmental Protection Agency reported secondhand smoke increases the risk for cough, colds and ear infections among children. In children with asthma, these symptoms are even more common and severe."

Quoted In:

Heideman, H., "Michigan needs smoking ban in all restaurants, workplaces," Port Huron Times-Herald, August 27, 2005.


Jerry Abramson, Mayor, Louisville, KY

"Louisville will become, in my judgment, a healthier hometown for us all."

Quoted In:

Gerth, J., "Smoking ban is signed into law: ordinance takes effect on Nov. 15," Louisville Courier-Journal, August 18, 2005.


R.T. Rybak, Mayor, Minneapolis, MN

"As mayor, I was proud to sign the City’s smoke-free ordinance. Smoke-free restaurants and bars help make our city healthier and reflect our values as a community."

Quoted In:

Peterson, III, I., "Mpls. mayoral candidates: whose bait looks best?," Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder, August 10, 2005.


Lorri Burgess, City Councilmember, Baton Rouge, LA

"I'm not trying to regulate morality, I'm just trying to help guarantee the quality of life. I'm not doing this because it's politically correct, I am doing this because it's the right thing to do. Nobody should be at risk because of second-hand smoke."

Quoted In:

Dyer, S., "Smoking ban up for discussion: public opinion sought on law that would kick cigarettes out of most public spaces," The Advocate, August 3, 2005.


Dave Cieslewicz, Mayor, Madison, WI

"I think we need some time to allow this to shake out before we make any rash judgements. The other point I want to make is this is good for public health. The main reason we did this is as a public health measure." Cieslewicz noted that he has received numerous letters in support of the law from the general public.

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Madison Mayor speaks on smoking ban," madison.com 15News, August 2, 2005.


John Manlove, Mayor, Pasadena, TX

Regarding a possible smokefree restaurant ordinance: "We have to be willing, as a city, to imagine possibilities. ... It's time we enact a serious anti-smoking ordinance."

Quoted In:

Christian, C., "Manlove: city needs restaurant smoking ban," Houston Chronicle, July 6, 2005.


Jim Doyle, Wisconsin Governor

Regarding a preemption bill and a possible veto: "I think it's best to allow communities to address this issue [smokefree air] as they see fit. They've had referendums. They can make their own decisions, and that's what's been happening in Wisconsin. I don't think we should be moving backward in the communities that have said, 'This is what we want for ourselves.'"

Quoted in: [n.a.], "Smoking bill passes Assembly: Doyle veto likely if Senate OKs it," Capital Times, June 24, 2005


Jim Doyle, Wisconsin Governor

On a preemption bill: "When communities are going out and looking out to protect the health of their citizens, the Legislature shouldn't be getting in their way and stopping them."

Quoted in: Forster, S. Marley, P., "Local smoking bans may be snuffed out: Assembly OKs state standards; bill goes to Senate," Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, June 24, 2005


Boog Highberger, Mayor, Lawrence, Kansas

"It [smokefree ordinance] has been enormously popular and is preferred by a high majority of our citizens. People are getting used to it, but not a lot of people (in the music scene) will talk about their opinion in public. I know a lot of bands like it, and I think it has been good for most music venues."

Quoted In:

Hugger, S., "Filtering secondhand smoke," Missourian, June 20, 2005.


Boog Highberger, Mayor, Lawrence, Kansas

"Smoke-free cities are becoming an international trend. I suggest, if a city makes a ban, they should do it all the way the first time and get it over with."

Quoted In:

Hugger, S., "Filtering secondhand smoke," Missourian, June 20, 2005.


Jeb Bush, Florida Governor

Regarding his veto of a bill to exempt Sloppy Joe's, a Key West bar, from the state's smokefree air law: "I am troubled by the precedent this sets. I do not want to encourage a precedent for creating carve-outs to the current statewide smoking laws."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "The smoking ban," Gainesville Sun, June 19, 2005.


Everette Varney, Mayor, Georgetown, KY

When casting the deciding vote for a smokefree ordinance: "For the health and welfare of the citizens of Georgetown, I vote yes."

Quoted In:

Lannen, S., "2nd city OKs smoking ban: Georgetown mayor breaks tie," Lexington Herald-Leader, June 17, 2005.


Everette Varney, Mayor, Georgetown, KY

Regarding his tie-breaking vote in support of a smokefree air ordinance: "I've got an obligation to my grandkids."

Quoted In:

Evans, M., "Georgetown council OKs smoking ban," Louisville Courier-Journal, June 17, 2005.


Dave Long, Executive Vice President, Montgomery County Chamber of Commerce, IN

In regard to a resolution issued by the chamber in support of a smokefree ordinance: "We were trying to look what was best for our members and what was best for the community. We felt, again, the health issues was an important issue we needed to address because even our smaller members are affected by this one way or another."

Quoted In:

[JMD], "Chamber of Commerce gets involved in smoking ban debate," WLFI, June 17, 2005.


Jim Graham, District of Columbia City Council member

"I will be supporting smoke-free initiatives for workplaces. I do so for one basic reason: Secondhand smoke makes many people sick and some people die. This is first and foremost a health issue."

Quoted In: Neibauer, M., "Three D.C. anti-smoking bills to get committee review," Washington Examiner, June 13, 2005.


Molly Markert, City Councilmember, Aurora, CO, City Council

"I want to go to the reservoir in the afternoon and not have to move 50 times because of the smell of smoke. We don't have to expose our citizens to smoke. ... And if we can't do it at a state level, we can do it on a regional level."

Quoted In:

Meyer, J. Crummy, K., "4 council members, 2 cities, 1 goal: smoking ban," Denver Post, June 7, 2005.


Carl Redus, Mayor, Pine Bluff, AR

"I support this measure wholeheartedly and I vote in favor of the measure."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Smoke-free ordinance passes in Pine Bluff," KARK 4, June 7, 2005.


Jeff Hogan, Alexandria, LA, City Councilman

Regarding his sponsorship of a smokefree ordinance: "It was more than about smokers' rights. It was a public health issue."

Quoted In:

Gunn, B., "Shreveport has stringent no-smoking law," Alexandria Town Talk, June 5, 2005.


Spencer Black, Wisconsin State Representative

Regarding a bill to preempt local smokefree ordinances: "I can't say if this will pass or not, but I'm very much opposed to it. This is a decision that should be left to the local communities. It's wrong for legislators to dictate what decisions local communities can make on matters that affect the local community."

Quoted In:

Behnke, L., "Tavern League of Wisconsin fights July 1 smoking ban," Daily Cardinal, June 3, 2005.


Rob Marionneaux, Louisiana Senator

"If the backward state of California can ban smoking in barrooms, then the great state of Louisiana can get on board."

Quoted In:

Simpson, D., "Bill would ban smoking in La. bars, casinos, restaurants," Associated Press, May 26, 2005.


John Adler, New Jersey Senator

Bowling alley owners sent bowling shoes to state legislators in protest of a smokefree air bill, arguing that smokers who step outside to smoke might get their shoes wet, and then slip when coming back into the building. Sen. Adler, sponsor of the bill, responded: "I guess it's just more dangerous to slip and fall wearing these cool bowling shoes than it is to breathe somebody else's smoke and die."

Quoted In:

Walsh, J., "Alley oops! Bowling shoes carry political message," Courier Post, May 23, 2005.


Douglas Carpenter, Former President, Grand Forks City Council, ND

"Opponents of a smoking ban generally oppose a ban by saying smoking is a legal activity, and laws shouldn't be passed on things that are legal or that individuals have a choice and can choose to not patronize establishments that allow smoking. But governments regulate and pass laws related to legal activities all the time. There are many laws relating to smoking (you must be 18 to buy cigarettes, for example), operating a restaurant (health codes, licenses and the like) and driving. Yes, individuals can choose to patronize establishments that don't allow smoking, but workers have a much more limited choice. Restaurants and bars provide many job opportunities for our young people. They should not have to sacrifice their health to earn money to pay for their education. We, as a society, have an obligation to recognize that life is about more than dollars and cents. We must take action, when necessary, to protect the health of our residents. The City Council needs to enact an ordinance to ban smoking from public places."

Quoted In:

Carpenter, D., "In the mail : tighten smoking ban further," Grand Forks Herald, May 14, 2005.


Jim Brainard, Mayor, Carmel, IN

Regarding a possible smokefree restaurant ordinance: "Our population in Carmel clearly wants this. It's the right thing to do healthwise."

Quoted In:

Browning, M., "Mayor to draft smoking ban: [hone survey backs measure; restrictions, details to be worked out," Topics.com, May 10, 2005.


Richard Blumenthal, Connecticut Attorney General

"The protests or dissatisfaction have largely dissipated and restaurants and bars are almost uniformly complying. It has been a tremendous, unqualified success."

Quoted In:

Damast, A., "A year later, little resistance to smoking ban," Greenwich Time, April 1, 2005.


Barbara Clack, Michigan State Representative

"We need a safer environment, we need a cleaner environment. I've appreciated the fact that we have had smoke-free work environments [in some counties in the state]. If we can do it, why not the entire state of Michigan? Parents need to take a look at this. (Secondhand smoke is) is really detrimental."

Quoted In:

Bukowski, A., "Clack backs bills to expand smoke ban," Flint Journal, April 20, 2005.


Everette Varney, Mayor, Georgetown, KY

On his support for a current smokefree ordinance proposal: "I was silent on this the last time, but I'm going to be vocal on this this time. I fully support this. It's the right time."

Quoted In:

Lannen, S., "Georgetown might ban some smoking," Lexington Herald-Leader, April 20, 2005.


Gary Kreidt, North Dakota Representative

"I feel that we have put into place a very good first start ... for making North Dakota a healthier, safer environment. Let's make some history in North Dakota today."

Quoted In:

Wetzel, D., "Smoking ban gets OK," Bismarck Tribune, April 19, 2005.


Sam Dunlop, Alderman, De Pere, WI

"The economic impacts are often good of a smoking ban, and we're looking to take those impacts and have them happen in De Pere."

Quoted In:

Barrington, R., "Student alderman says smoking ban makes cents," Green Bay News-Chronicle, April 14, 2005.


Mark Russell, City Councilman, Huntsville, AL

"I think it's the right thing to do. I've always thought that."

Quoted In:

Peck, J., "Councilman's smoking ban to get extra backing tonight," Huntsville Times, April 14, 2005.


Tim Jenkins, City Council Member, Georgetown, Kentucky

"The primary reason local governments exist is to protect the overall health, safety and well-being of its citizens. If enough citizens want clean indoor air here, then the council has a responsibility to enact a clean indoor air ordinance."

Quoted In:

Hall, K., "Anti-smoking forum to be held Tuesday evening," Georgetown News-Graphic, April 10, 2005.


Don Thomas, Georgia Senator

"I've seen so many deaths caused by tobacco and so much damage -- emphysema, pulmonary disease. We are trying to protect the children from the harmful effects of second-hand smoke."

Quoted In:

Vu, P., "Smoking bans spread to Tobacco Road," Stateline.org, April 6, 2005.


Robert W. Curran, Baltimore, MD, City Councilman

"When your smoking infringes on the health of others, that's when government restrictions should come into effect. Why should others who want to go to places because of the atmosphere and camaraderie, why should they be forced not to go because of the smoking?"

Quoted In:

Rosen, J., "Bill seeks to extend smoking ban in city: proposal would affect public spaces, including bars and restaurants; measure to be introduced today," Baltimore Sun, March 21, 2005.


John Hickenlooper, Mayor, Denver, CO

"You can't subject people in the workplace to unnecessary health risks."

Quoted In:

Associated Press, "Legislature hears plan to ban public smoking statewide," Denver Post, March 15, 2005.


Mark Larson, Colorado State Representative and former truck stop owner

Larson stated that visitors to the state, "...don't come to breathe our contaminated air."

Quoted In:

Associated Press, "Legislature hears plan to ban public smoking statewide," Denver Post, March 15, 2005.


Dan Grossman, Colorado State Senator

"We are going to have a level playing field, and the level playing field will be a safe workplace."

Quoted In:

Associated Press, "Legislature hears plan to ban public smoking statewide," Denver Post, March 15, 2005.


Diane Rosenbaum, Oregon State Representative, D-Portland

"No one should have to choose between their personal livelihoods and their health."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Bar smoking ban talks draws crowd," News-Review, March 11, 2005.


Duncan Munro, Legislative Assistant to Maryland Delegate Barbara Frush (D-District 21-Anne Arundel and Prince George’s)

On ventilation systems and secondhand smoke: "What you’re getting is a poisonous atmosphere that smells better."

Quoted In:

Graver, K., "Assembly considers Delaware-style smoke ban," Ocean City Today, March 5, 2005.


Eric Griego, Albuquerque, NM City Council Member

"Albuquerque's experience with a smoking ban has proved that clean air is good for business -- gross receipts from restaurants are up almost seven percent since the Albuquerque smoking ban was implemented."

Quoted In:

New Mexico Municipal League, "Municipal League endorses statewide smoking ban," Santa Fe, NM: New Mexico Municipal League, February 10, 2005.


Don Thomas, Georgia State Senator

"There's no question that second-hand smoke is killing people all over Georgia. This [smokefree bill] is a money-saver and it will save lives."

Quoted In:

Moriarty, E., "Georgia is one step closer to becoming a smoke-free state," Atlanta Business Chronicle, February 9, 2005.


John F. Street, Mayor, Philadelphia, PA

"For me, the pivotal question is the employees. How do you protect employees? There's a natural reservation about doing anything that might have the impact of losing one or more customers. But I think they will quickly learn that if nobody allows smoking, then they are not at any disadvantage. People who go to the restaurants in this city will just accept the fact that if you want to have a smoke, get that last puff before you go in. I think progressive cities all over the country are doing it. It's the wave of the future, and I don't think we should be bringing up the rear on it."

Quoted In:

McDonald, M., "Street backs smoking ban: 'wave of the future,' he says of bill," Philadelphia Inquirer, February 4, 2005.


John F. Street, Mayor, Philadelphia, PA

Regarding a proposed smokefree ordinance, "For me, a pivotal question is the employees - how do you protect the employees? What this will do is provide a clean environment for those people who work in those areas, and those who want to visit them."

Quoted In:

Couloumbis, A., "Nutter introduces new 'no-smoking' bill in Council," Philadelphia Inquirer, February 4, 2005.


Michael A. Nutter, Philadelphia, PA City Council member

Regarding a proposed smokefree ordinance, "This is a public-health issue."

Quoted In:

Couloumbis, A., "Nutter introduces new 'no-smoking' bill in Council," Philadelphia Inquirer, February 4, 2005.


Ernesto De Leon, Brownsville, Texas, City Commissioner

“The reason (I support this ordinance) is because first of all, second-hand smoke is very detrimental to your health. It’s time we look at the health aspect in order to protect our citizens that are subjected to second-hand smoke. I know there’s going to be people who don’t like (the ordinance). (But) it’s a very important thing that needs to be done and addressed.”

Quoted In:

Valdez Villarreal, C., "City pushes for smoke-free Brownsville," Brownsville Herald, January 14, 2005.


David Schauner, Lawrence, Kansas, City Commissioner

Schauner listed the city's smokefree ordinance as one of the commission's most significant accomplishments. "I really think the ban has been a very good thing for most businesses." Schauner acknowledged some complaints by bars and restaurants, and stated, "But I don't think the majority of people want smoking back in bars and restaurants."

Quoted In:

Lawhorn, C., "Schauner wants to keep seat," Lawrence Journal-World, January 13, 2005.


Doug Van Sant, Bridgeton, New Jersey, City Councilman and Owner, Angie's Bridgeton Grill

"I realized that a person who smoked could make the decision to come into my restaurant and smoke. But that person who smokes could come in and eat and not smoke. The people that (smoking) offended could not make that choice and had to contend with smoke being blown in their faces."

On possible loss of business: "It's unfortunate, but, I'll tell you, by and large, I've had at least more than a dozen customers come up to me personally and people making phone calls congratulating me for doing it and I haven't had one customer give me damnation for it. But I guess my damnation will be they won't come here anymore."

Quoted In:

McCullen, S.C., "Angie's Grill, 101 join smoke-free eateries," NJ.com, January 13, 2005.


David Dunfield, Lawrence (KS) City Commissioner

"This is an enormously popular ordinance (ban). I think five years from now the Lawrence ordinance will be the norm nationwide. We're just a slight step ahead of some communities." -

Quoted In:

Lawhorn, Chad "Smoking compromise fizzles," Journal-World, December 15, 2004.


William Daniel, Louisiana State Representative

"All we need to do is to get the mayor and the city council to go forward and approve that [a smokefree restaurant ordinance]. I don't know about the political reality, but it's an absolute health reality that we need to move toward that."

Quoted In:

Dyer, S., "Smoking focus of mayor's forum," 2theadvocate.com, September 1, 2004.


Heather Harden, Bloomington, MN City Council member

"This is a workplace safety issue. It's time for someone to step to the plate and take the flak. This is a time for leaders only, and this is our opportunity to demonstrate leadership. If we take action, the other cities will fall in line."

Quoted In:

Harden, Heather. "Bloomington went smoke-free, and many said thanks," The Star Tribune, July 31, 2004.


R.T. Rybak, Mayor of Minneapolis, MN

"I'll lead the first smoke-free bus tour of bars," Rybak said. "If you want to sell a beer to the mayor, go smoke-free."

Quoted In:

Crisp, Lacey, "Minneapolis OKs smoking ban," The Minnesota Daily, July 28, 2004.


Bill Owen, Mayor of Roswell, NM

"The clean air act, pure and simple, has to do with health. It has to do with providing a healthy atmosphere within our community. Many times, I think, the issue of smoking and non-smoking gets confused with people's rights."

Quoted In:

Goble, Shannon. "City set to launch Smoke Free Air Act," Roswell Daily Record, July 22, 2004.


Steve Henderson, City Councilor, Roswell, NM

"When you realize that 53,000 people a year in the United States die of second-hand smoke that is something that cannot be ignored. The fact is that we have people that have been affected. Their health has been deteriorated by second-hand smoke and that allows the government to take an active stand against second-hand smoke. Fortunately over the years we have been able to provide the statistics that show actually businesses, restaurants or bars do not suffer because of the smoking issue. In fact, more people like to go to those places because it is smoke free."

Quoted In:

Goble, Shannon. "City set to launch Smoke Free Air Act," Roswell Daily Record, July 22, 2004.


Mike Brown, Mayor, Grand Forks, ND

"It's no longer smokers' rights versus nonsmokers' rights. It's a health issue.You can debate all you want about your rights, but you don't have the right to cause harm to someone."

Quoted In:

Timpe, B., "Smoke-free work places: Brown backs ban mayor says smoke-free issue may come before council this month," Grand Forks Herald, July 17, 2004.


Kathy Lantry, St. Paul, Minnesota, City Council Member

"It's a public health issue. We don't allow smoking in any other workplace. Why do we allow it in bars and restaurants?"

Quoted in:

Ingrassia, R., "City council might have majority for smoking ban," Pioneer Press, May 22, 2004


Gary Schiff, Minneapolis City Council Member

Schiff denied that there was a coordinated effort between cities to enact smokefree ordinances, "I think this all has to do with pent-up demand from the public for clean air."

Quoted in:

Crosby, J. Kennedy, T., "St. Paul council's Thune leads the rally against smoking," Star Tribune, May 15, 2004


Ron Latz, Minnesota State Representative, DFL-St. Louis Park

"My bill to expand the Minnesota Clean Indoor Air Act received a timely boost by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's recent recommendation that people who wish to avoid heart attacks stay away from indoor secondhand tobacco smoke. Recent news reports have highlighted findings that a secondhand smoking ban caused a 40% reduction in heart attacks. As a result, the CDC has advised medical doctors to tell patients with heart disease to stay out of indoor spaces that allow smoking.

The Freedom to Breathe Act would make Minnesota one of a growing number of states and countries that ban smoking in restaurants, bars and virtually every public building, place of employment and public meeting.

...

Tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke takes a dramatic toll on the health and well-being of Minnesotans and their economy. The Minnesota Department of Health projects that tobacco use imposes $2.6 billion in health and economic costs in the state.

Tobacco use kills approximately 5,600 Minnesotans each year. 1,800 of those deaths occur as a result of secondhand smoke. A recent study in New Zealand found a 15 percent higher death rate for nonsmokers who live in a smoker's household than in a smoke-free household. This is no surprise: tobacco smoke is Class A carcinogen.

...

A statewide ban levels the playing field. Local businesses need not fear being placed at a competitive disadvantage by a local ordinance banning smoking if the state does it. Indeed, many local communities and businesses — in rural, suburban and urban Minnesota — have passed resolutions or made statements that they prefer a statewide ban over a local ban.

...

With this latest CDC report, I ask my opponents: how much more proof do you need? How long must we wait?"


Quoted in:

Latz, R., "Pass the Freedom to Breathe Act," Minnesota Daily, June 1, 2004


Dave Thune, St. Paul, MN City Council member

"This is a public-health issue. We need to protect patrons and staff at our establishments.''

Thune, a smoker, stated, "...it is not fair that others have to breathe my smoke."

"I'm doing this for St. Paul. I'm doing this for families and parents … who should not have to choose restaurants based on their health and the health of their children. I'm doing this for (restaurant staff) who should not have to go to work every day knowing that they are faced with significant increased risk of developing lung cancer.''

Quoted in:

Karlson, K., "St. Paul considers ban on smoking," St. Paul Pioneer Press, May 6, 2004


Dave Thune, St. Paul, MN, City Council Member

"Exposure to secondhand smoke -- even for short periods of time -- can be deadly, especially for those with heart conditions. A recent study from Helena, Mont., found that exposure to secondhand smoke in that community greatly increased the incidence of heart attacks among smokers and nonsmokers alike. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has concluded that widespread exposure to secondhand smoke presents a serious and substantial public health risk, contributing to approximately 3,000 lung cancer deaths annually in the United States among nonsmokers.

It's been reported that groups aligned with the tobacco industry say that a universal requirement for smoke-free restaurants and bars will likely occur in 10 years anyway, so why push for it today? My response: Why wait? Why let thousands of Twin Citians and visitors get sick and in some cases die when you can save them by doing what many other cities around the nation have done?

I've also heard opponents to smoke-free restaurants and bars say that it should be a matter of choice -- if you don't want to spend time in a smoke-filled restaurant or bar, go elsewhere. Choice? What about restaurant and bar employees who don't smoke? Their choice is to either quit their jobs or face an increased risk of lung cancer. What about those people who are forced to pay higher insurance premiums and medical bills because of the death and disease spread by exposure to secondhand smoke? Can they choose not to pay their premiums or prorated medical bills? Hardly.

The last fact has to do with economics -- an issue critical to the future of the Twin Cities. The several cities and states that have already gone smoke-free give us a chance to measure the economic effects of those actions.

After New York City's smoke-free ordinance took effect, bars and restaurants paid the city 12 percent more in tax revenues in the first six months because their sales increased. The New York State Liquor Authority issued 1,416 new liquor licenses to New York City bars and restaurants in 2003.

An analysis by the Texas Department of Health found that a smoking ban implemented in El Paso in 2002 resulted in no statistically significant changes in restaurant and bar revenues.

A study conducted by researchers at Northern Arizona University found that Flagstaff's smoke-free restaurant ordinance had no adverse effect on restaurant sales, as measured by tax data collected both before and after the ordinance took effect.

The story of either positive economic effect or no adverse effect from smoke-free ordinances has been repeated all across the United States, including in Duluth.

So why not implement a smoke-free policy in Minneapolis and St. Paul restaurants and bars? There really is no good reason not to. It saves lives, protects health and boosts the economy. Everybody wins."


Quoted in:

Thune, D., "Dave Thune: Twin Cities shouldn't compete over health," Star Tribune, May 23, 2004


Greg Nickels, Mayor, Seattle, Washington

"We are no longer ignorant to the tragically deadly effects of working in a smoke-infested facility. The bottom line is that if you have to work in a bar or a restaurant or some other place that still allows smoking, you are far more likely to suffer and die from cancer, heart disease or other tobacco-related causes."

Quoted in:

McGann, C., "Drive opens to ban smoking in bars statewide: lighting up in restaurants also would be prohibited by I-890," Seattle Post-Intelligencer, April 15, 2004


Mike Scanlon, CEO of Thomas & King and Vice Mayor of Lexington, Kentucky

On making the company's Applebee's franchises smokefree: "We believe that smoke-free is a smart business decision and one that will build our customer base in the long run. Study after study shows that smoke-free policies have a positive effect on business. What's been most important to me are the many personal conversations I've had with guests in our local neighborhood restaurants. This is what makes me confident of the bottom-line impact for Thomas and King."

Quoted in:

[n.a.], "Dayton Applebee's snuffs smoking," Dayton Business Journal, May 18, 2004


Dan Niziolek, Minneapolis, MN City Councilman

Regarding his support for a proposed smokefree ordinance: "This is a workplace issue. This is a public space issue."


Quoted in:

Russell, S. McKenzie, S., "Downtown grapples with smoking ban," SkywayNews, May 17, 2004


Don Samuels, Minneapolis, MN City Councilman

Regarding his support for a proposed smokefree ordinance: "I found people really do want to change. The overwhelming majority of the public wants smoking to be banned in public spaces."


Quoted in:

Russell, S. McKenzie, S., "Downtown grapples with smoking ban," SkywayNews, May 17, 2004


Mike Scanlon, CEO of Thomas & King and Vice Mayor of Lexington, Kentucky

Regarding a smokefree ordinance in Mesa, Arizona, Scanlon stated that "business turned out great." Scanlon said business dropped briefly, then "rebounded after three months." Scanlon concluded, "Our business wasn't hurt at all." Scanlon recently decided to make all 76 of his Applebee's franchises smokefree.

Quoted in:

[n.a.], "Experience is proving the benefits of smoking bans," Louisville Courier-Journal, May 17, 2004


Mike Scanlon, CEO and president of Thomas & King and Vice Mayor of Lexington, Kentucky

"I can see both sides of the issue. However, as a businessman, I need to listen to my customers and do what I believe is right for my business. Our guests absolutely love these smoke-free environments. This is strictly an effort to reach out to our guests and to give them what they want."

Quoted in:

Evans, M., "Restaurants operated by Kentucky company to go smokefree," Associated Press/Charlotte Observer, May 10, 2004


Mike Scanlon, CEO and president of Thomas & King and Vice Mayor of Lexington, Kentucky

"The No. 1 way to drive customer sales is to drive customer satisfaction. The No. 1 way to drive customer satisfaction is to take all of our stores, almost 80 of them, smoke-free."

Quoted in:

Qu, M., "Applebee's restaurants go smoke-free," Lexington Herald-Leader, May 11, 2004


Mike Scanlon, CEO and president of Thomas & King and Vice Mayor of Lexington, Kentucky

On a decision by Thomas & King, the third-largest Applebee's franchisee in the country, to make its 16 franchises in the Greater Cincinnati, Ohio, area smokefree: "This is a business decision, and that's where this needs to be. I'm not a health expert. This is what our customers want. They are saying that they don't want smoking in the restaurants and that they're not coming in as much because of the smoke. Even when you have a smoke-free section, the smoke still bleeds in." Scanlon noted that sales at franchises in Sierra Vista, Arizona, and Sidney, Ohio, increased after going smokefree, with a 30 percent rise in Sierra Vista. Scanlon added, "There are a lot of myths about no smoking policies -- that your employees will quit, your guests will quit coming, and the place will be empty. We've proved every one of those myths wrong."

Quoted In:

Paeth, G., "Going smokeless: it's just good business, Applebee's franchisee says," Cincinnati Post, May 13, 2004.


Boog Highberger, Lawrence, KS, City Commissioner

"There is substantial evidence that second-hand smoke in the workplace, including bars and restaurants, is a health risk for people who work in those places. Some people say that if you don't want to be exposed to cigarette smoke, you can work somewhere else. To me, that is sort of like a coal mine owner saying to his or her workers that if you don't want black lung disease, you can work somewhere else. I can't tell you how many people I've talked to that have told me that they can't go out because they have health problems or that they choose not to go out just because they can't stand the smoke."

Quoted In:

Mathis, J., "Commissioner stands by ban support: Highberger, in online chat, says second-hand smoke dangers merit prohibition
," Lawrence Journal-World, May 13, 2004.


Charles J. Isdell, Philadelphia Director of Aviation

"The airport’s new policy will make Philadelphia International Airport 100-percent smoke-free to protect the public and airport employees from the adverse health effects of second-hand smoke."

Quoted In:

Mengers, P., "Airport to institute smoking ban," Daily Times, April 29, 2004.


Kwame Kilpatrick, Mayor, Detroit, MI

In support of Wayne County's ordinance, "It is imperative that we protect the health and economic well being of county residents and its employees."

Quoted In:

Schmitt, B., "Ban on smoking at work is passed: Wayne County rule awaits Ficano's OK," Detroit Free Press, March 19, 2004.


Howard Hallman, Silverthorne, CO, City Council Member

"The smoking ban debate has been characterized as a public health versus private rights issue. The public health benefits of this ban outweigh the private rights. When you open a business to the public, you take on added responsibilities."

Quoted In:

McManus, C., "Silverthorne passes smoking ban," Vail Daily News, April 5, 2004.


Sheila Groneman, Silverthorne, CO, City Council Member

"Many of us have the luxury of working in a smoke-free environment, but that's not the case right now [without the ban] for restaurant and bar employees."

Quoted In:

McManus, C., "Silverthorne passes smoking ban," Vail Daily News, April 5, 2004.


Mike Merkel, Police Chief, City of Alvin, Texas

"Healthy lifestyles include eating nutritious meals and enjoying meals in a smokefree environment with family, friends, and important people in our lives. Several restaurants appeared before the city council to challenge and criticize the smokefree ordinance, citing loss of business. Ironically, today these same restaurants are packed with increased business from this community and new business from surrounding communities."

Quoted In:

Merkel, M., "Personal communication," [2004].


Jack Weiss, Los Angeles, CA, City Councilman

“Today we are going to take a very important step which will continue the reputation of this city as an environmental leader throughout the country. Our beaches are our most precious natural resource, and they are -- and ought to be -- our most pristine recreational resource."

Quoted In:

Mah, R., "Weiss champions anti-smoking law," Los Angeles Independent, April 28, 2004.


David Thune, St. Paul, MN, City Council Member

"It's a house of cards and it's about to collapse on tobacco. It's all over now but the shouting. There's no reason why people have to breathe our smoke. It's not a matter of convenience or taste. It really is a matter of public health."

Quoted In:

Crosby, J., "Smoker is behind a ban in St. Paul," Star Tribune, May 6, 2004.


Kevin Phelps, Spokesperson for Breathe Easy Washington and Tacoma City Councilmember

Re: a ballot initiative to permit smoking in venues that do not serve minors: "Patrons have a choice of where they go. Workers don't. Their initiative is a ruse, because they're not protecting their employees. And I think this will be borne out when the two campaigns get going."

Quoted in:

Vogel, K.P., "Smoking battle might go to voters," Tacoma News Tribune, March 15, 2004


Phil Andrews, ontgomery County, MD, Councilmember

Andrews, a co-sponsor of the county-wide smokefree ordinance, said that the Gaithersburg City Council "recognized this was necessary to protect the public's health." Andrews added that the vote is "important not only for what it does to protect the workers and patrons in those restaurants but also for helping assure there is a level playing field throughout the county."

Quoted in:

Aizenman, N.C., "Gaithersburg adopts broad smoking ban," Washington Post: B3, March 3, 2004


Ralph Brown, Jr., Mayor, Buena Vista, OH

"We see this as the right thing to do and the right time to do it. As a community leader, I am concerned with anything that can cause harm to any of our citizens, especially our youth."


Quoted In:

Franklin, H., "Buena Vista bans smoking: ordinance goes into effect April 1," Ledger-Enquirer, March 4, 2004.


Laura Miller, Mayor, Dallas, TX

Mayor Laura Miller praised the city's one-year old smokefree ordinance, "I think it's been very successful. The public loves it, and I don't want to open it up again, and I don't want to amend it, and I don't want to change it."

Quoted In:

Mckee, M., "Business goes away with smoke, some say," Star-Telegram,, February 28, 2004.


Jack Weiss, Los Angeles City Council Member

Weiss told his Santa Monica counterparts on Tuesday that he supported the ordinance and would draft one like it for Los Angeles's 10 miles of beaches.

"This is not about sending armies of cops up and down the beach to haul smokers away. It's about changing attitudes about where it is socially acceptable to smoke. It takes time, but you don't see smokers fighting for the right to light up on airplanes any more."

Quoted In:

Madigan, N., "More California air space set for no-smoke zones," New York Times, March 25, 2004.


Will Toor, Mayor, Boulder, CO

"The smokefree ordinance has been good for the health of our community and good for business in Boulder. Not only do Boulder's workers and residents appreciate the smokefree air today, but will enjoy the long-term health benefits for decades to come. I am pleased that Boulder is being recognized for its smokefree workplace law."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "[Press Release re: Boulder's smokefree ordinance]," Berkeley, CA: Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights, March 15, 2004.


Brent Hill, Idaho Senator

“We´ve got to open our eyes and realize there´s a danger out there that we thought was just an annoyance. It [secondhand smoke] may not kill as quickly as a drunk driver, but it kills just as effectively.” Hill told the committee to listen to a waitress who planned to testify, hoping to stop talk of amending the bill to keep allowing designated smoking sections in some restaurants. “I want you to look into her eyes, and realize that if you amend this bill, she has more than twice the chance of dying from lung disease as a person in another occupation."

Quoted In:

Hahn, G., "After 5 hours of testimony, smoking ban moves to House," Idaho Statesman, March 11, 2004.


Bob Ring, Idaho Representative

Ring said restaurant owners who opposed the bill seemed to “prefer to endanger the life and health” of their customers.

“This particular bill can probably be the most important thing this committee or this Legislature can do to make a dramatic improvement in the health of the state of Idaho, and particularly in the Medicaid department. I believe that we need to have the courage to vote this bill to the floor or vote to kill it forever, and face the 75 percent of our constituents who desperately want this bill.”

Quoted In:

Hahn, G., "After 5 hours of testimony, smoking ban moves to House," Idaho Statesman, March 11, 2004.


Sam Mamula, Mayor, Breckenridge, CO

"I don't want to be responsible, frankly, for even one person getting lung cancer because I decided to look on the economic side rather than on the health side."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Breckenridge and Frisco (CO) pass smokefree workplace laws," Summit Daily News, February 25, 2004.


Greg Gilbert, Duluth, MN, City Councilman

"It's been a huge success for the city. The vast majority of people love it, and they'd be horrified to go back."

Quoted In:

Oakes, L., "In Duluth, they both love and hate their smoking ban," Star Tribune, February 21, 2004


Dr. Adewale Troutman, Director, Louisville Metro Health Department, KY

"A complete ban is what makes the most sense — there's no doubt about it." Troutman stated that businesses that permit smoking are "damaging the health of their constituents as well as the health of their workers," and that he had informed the mayor that "the only way you can guarantee protecting the public from exposure to secondhand smoke is to eliminate it in public places."

Quoted in:

Allen, W., "Troutman supports smoking ban: new health chief talks of health toll," Courier-Journal, January 13, 2004


Mark Larson, Owner, M&M Truck Stop and Family Restaurant, Cortez, CO and State Representative for House District 59

"You can imagine my angst at taking my truck stop nonsmoking. After all, many truckers smoke and they are a significant percentage of my clientele. Initially, we had a few customers walk out. However, I cannot think of one customer that has not returned because of the policy. I was ready to reinstate the smoking policy in a heartbeat if things didn't work out, but all of my fears were quieted in a very short time. The no-smoking policy increased my local customer base, expanded my tourism base, and kept my truckers coming too. Now that we are smoke-free my employee absences are reduced, my facility is easier to keep clean, and seating customers is faster and simpler. Best of all, I have the peace of mind that a truck stop can successfully go nonsmoking and not lose sales volume."

Quoted In:

Larson, M., "Truck Stop Owner/Legislator Says Economic Fears Never Materialized," GASP of Colorado Web Site — http://www.gaspforair.org/gasp/, 2004


John Baldacci, Governor of Maine

"Today I am signing into law a historic step toward providing cleaner indoor air to all Maine people. This bill makes all lounges and taverns, pool halls and certain off-track betting facilities smoke free. Together with the previously signed bill that provides for smoke-free bingo and beano halls, the 121st Legislature is providing cleaner indoor air for man of our public and workers who were previously not protected against secondhand smoke, a Class A carcinogen." Baldacci added, "Don't get me wrong, smokers are welcomed throughout the state of Maine. We simply ask that you leave your burning cigarettes at the door so that [your] health and the health of others around you will be better protected."

Quoted In:

Quinn, F.X., "Baldacci signs ban on smoke in bars," Bangor Daily News, June 25, 2003.


Barbara Brenner, Whatcom County, Washington, Council Councilwoman

Brenner stated that smokers have the right to "poison themselves. They don't have the right to poison other people."

Quoted In:

Porter, M., "County: ban public smoking council will write to legislators to include restaurants, bars in statewide ban," Bellingham Herald, February 4, 2004.


Brent Hill, Idaho Senator

Sen Hill has sponsored a smokefree public places bill and stated that his 28-year-old son Richie, who has lung cancer, could only have contracted the disease from secondhand smoke exposure. Hill stated "This is nothing new to businesses. Businesses are used to regulations for health and safety. This country is free because of the laws that we have, not because
of the absence of laws."

Quoted In:

Hoffman, W., "Senator backs no-smoking rules: bill sponsor blames second- hand smoke for son's illness," Idaho Statesman, January 28, 2004.


Steve Cohen, Tennessee Senator

On preemption of local clean indoor air ordinances:

"The state didn't usurp it to come up with a regulation. It usurped it so there would be no regulation."

Quoted In:

Cheek, D., "Cities want power to ban smoking in restaurants," Tennessean, January 25, 2004.


Gary Haddock, Windsor, CO, Town Board Member

On a proposed smokefree ordinance:

"To me, it's a matter of public safety - this is a serious health issue. But just because I think that way doesn't mean that's the way it will go."

Quoted In:

Olsen, N., "Windsor smoking ban could go to voters,," Greeley Tribune, January 21, 2004.


Ron Moss, Mayor, Maryville, CO

"It was the right decision. The majority of the people in our county wants and supports this ordinance. Seventy-one percent of the people in Nodaway and Andrew Counties indicated that they would support a law that eliminated smoking in restaurants."

Quoted In:

[n.a.], "Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights honor Maryville for city ordinance," Maryville Daily Forum, [January 26, 2003].


Tom Stengren, Arlington Heights (IL) Trustee

On smokefree policies. "We promised to protect the health and safety of our residents, and I can't think of a more important issue. We all know that eventually this is going to happen. It's going to happen here. It's going to happen across the state. It's going to happen across the country."

Quoted In:

Deering, T., "Smoke ban pushed again," Chicago Tribune, January 12, 2004.


Pete Schwartzkopf, Delaware State Representative

"Personally, I do not believe this [Delaware's smokefree law] will be an election issue, especially considering the immensely favorable rating the ban has had. The rating has jumped already and we are still a year from the election. I think the favorable rating of the ban will go higher. Like most people, I don't need a doctor's report or polls to tell me secondhand smoke is dangerous."

Quoted In:
Reynolds Hughes, B., "Smoking ban opposition is losing its momentum," Cape Gazette, November 29, 2003.



Larry Medina, Former city council member and former Mayor Pro Tem, El Paso, TX

"I learned the government has a duty and responsibility to protect the public's health. In a city of almost 700,000, we are not just saving a few lives ... that makes you feel like a champion."


Quoted In:
Sheridan, J., "Ex-El Paso official informs against public smoking," Texarkana Gazette, November 14, 2003.



Kevin Charles, Chief of Health Systems Protection, Delaware Division of Public Health

"Society is driving this thing, quite frankly. This is what society wants."

Quoted In:
Miller, B., "Smoking ban: one year later the smoke has cleared, and although some bars are hurting, complaints have fallen off," News Journal, November 25, 2003.



Robert J. Valihura Jr., Delaware State Representative

"It's a social norm now ... and every day that we experience smoke-free dining, it becomes ingrained in our community and lifestyle and people accept it. It would be like trying to bring smoking back on airplanes. Just think about putting lighted material on a plane now. It's almost to the point where you think - how could we ever have done that?"

Quoted In:
Miller, B., "Smoking ban: one year later the smoke has cleared, and although some bars are hurting, complaints have fallen off," News Journal, November 25, 2003.


Mike Scanlon, Vice Mayor of Lexington, KY, and President and Chief Executive of Thomas & King, a Lexington-based 76-unit Applebee's franchise

"My decision was no small matter. There's a great deal of legend and myth in the air about the supposed negative business impact of a smoking ban. The fact is, if I have a choice between hurting people with secondhand smoke or hurting one operator with my vote, I'll choose the latter."

Quoted in:
Lohmeyer, L., Hayes, J., "Smoke signals: bans become habit forming lobbyists pack punch in successful effort to prohibit cigarettes in bars, restaurants, " Nation's Restaurant News 37(38): 94 , September 22, 2003.


Jack Leadbetter, former Mayor of Marquette, MI

"Passing a strict smoking ordinance was one of the most significant actions ever taken by a Marquette City Commission. The ordinance has improved the quality of life for the worker as well as for the public at large. I would encourage any governmental unit to pass similar legislation and consider it a gift to your community."

Quoted In:
City of Marquette, Michigan Recognized For Strong Smokefree Law. ANR Press Release, October 10, 2003.



Michael Bloomberg, Mayor of New York City

"The problem with loopholes are that there are people that are working there, and I'm not quite sure how I could look one person in the eye and say your health isn't as important as someone else's…[W]e have to protect the workers. That's what this legislation is all about."

Quoted In:
Edozien, F. "Bloomberg comes out smoking." New York Post, November 1, 2002.



Laura Miller, Mayor of Dallas, TX

"I know that the vast majority of citizens in Dallas really like the smoking ban and support it," she said. "I think that even if they [the opposition] were to get enough petitions to turn somebody's head, I think that the citizens will tell you it's a great thing."

Quoted In:
McKee, M. "Group seeks weaker smoking ordinance in Dallas." Fort Worth Star Telegram, March 12, 2003.



Thomas Menino, Mayor of Boston, MA

"I am proud to support this effort on behalf of all those workers who feel they have no economic choice but to keep a job that may be slowly killing them. No one should ever have to make the choice between working in a healthy environment, and putting food on the table. This effort will not only clear the air in Boston's workplaces, it will also promote cleaner lungs for those who work in them-protecting people is what this is all about."

Quoted In:
"Mayor Menino announces support for smoke-free workplaces in Boston." Media Release. Boston Public Health Commission. September 24, 2002.



Gene Matthews, Mayor of Loganville, GA

"Since the ordinance has been in place, I have heard far more praises - 25 to one - than complaints. The enforcement is going well and while the City continues to monitor compliance, the law basically enforces itself. People from Loganville and other areas have called to thank us for passing this ordinance, and we have been getting requests from other cities and states asking for a copy of this model ordinance."

Quoted In:

City Of Loganville, Georgia Recognized For Strong Smokefree Law. ANR Press Release, October 9, 2003.



Bill Cain, Mayor of Albany, CA

"Our intention in passing our ordinance was not to prevent smoking. That is a personal choice that each person must make. What we are attempting to do is to prevent one person's (the smoker) actions from negatively impacting another person's (the non-smoker) rights to live life in a healthful environment. As one of the council members from a neighboring city told me a few weeks ago, "You can chose where to smoke, you can't choose where to breathe."

Quoted In:
Cain, B., "[Page 2 of a letter to Madison, Wisconsin mayor Paul Soglin re: Albany's smoking ordinance]," Albany: Office of the Mayor, October 21, 1992.



Sandy Oitzinger, City Commissioner, Helena, MT

"I want to acknowledge the 62% of Helena voters who exercised their right to vote and ultimately passed this important public health protection. The recent action by the legislature to undermine local health protection efforts from this deadly carcinogen, hurts Helena workers, seniors, children and families and sends a very inconsistent message on the dangers of tobacco use and secondhand smoke exposure to our youth. I know that Helena will reap the health benefits from this proactive policy for years to come."

Quoted In:
City Of Helena, Montana Recognized For Strong Smokefree Law. ANR Press Release, October 6, 2003.



Dr. Bill Sova, President of the Pueblo, Colorado, City Council

"I feel it is the duty of our elected representatives to safeguard the health of their citizens and the smoke free ordinance shows we care about them."

Quoted In:
Sova, B., "[Letter to Teresa Ann Isaac, Mayor of Lexington, Kentucky, re: congratulations for smokefree ordinance]," [Puebo, CO: Dr. Bill Sova], July 22, 2003.



Larry Medina, former Mayor Pro Tem, El Paso, TX

"I [initially said] there was no way I would vote for another ordinance that would tell business owners how to run their businesses." After educating himself about the health hazards of secondhand smoke, he said, "I wanted to be on the right side of the issue. Even if it meant not being on the winning side…I learned the government has a duty and responsibility to protect the public's health."

Quoted In:
Sheridan, J. "Ex-El Paso official informs against public smoking." Texarkana Gazette, November 14, 2003.



Norma Jellison, Mayor of El Cerrito, CA

"We have received more praise for having taken this action [of enacting a smokefree workplace and restaurant ordinance]than we have complaints. Restaurants have not complained of any adverse effects from the smoking ban. The El Cerrito Chamber of Commerce is very supportive of the ordinance and helped in our education campaign."

Quoted In:
Jellison, N., "[Letter to Madison, Wisconsin Mayor Paul R. Slogin re: El Cerrito ordinance]," El Cerrito: Office of the Mayor, October 16, 1992.



Nancy Nathanson, City Council Vice President, Eugene, OR

"We are pleased that our community is being recognized for its smokefree workplaces, restaurants, and bars. The law is working and has accomplished the primary goal of protecting workers and the public from secondhand smoke. There were some initial issues and apprehensions while businesses put in the money and the time to comply with the new rules, but since then things have gone smoothly. The immediate benefit is a more pleasant indoor environment throughout the city, but the long-term cumulative health benefits are even better."

Quoted In:
City of Eugene Recognized for Smokefree Law. Eugene City Council Newsletter, November 6, 2003.



Neil Giuliano, Mayor of Tempe, AZ

"Tempe's model ordinance has been a very positive public policy change for our community…I do not support any efforts to weaken or overturn the law. I hope more communities will join New York City, Boston and Tempe in becoming smokefree."

Quoted In:
Giuliano, N.G., "[Letter to whom it may concern re: Tempe, Arizona's experience with a smokefree air law]," [Tempe, AZ: Mayor Neil G. Giuliano], June 2, 2003.



Hugh Short, Mayor of Bethel, AK

"We are proud to be associated with other communities in Alaska that realize the rights of their citizens to live their life without the threat of secondhand smoke."

Quoted In:
"City Of Bethel Recognized for Strong Smokefree Law." The Delta Discovery, June 25, 2003.



Shirley Allen, Mayor of Metcalfe, MS

"On Oct. 16 we became the first town in the state to become smoke free," while speaking "on the importance of building better communities to attract new industries."

Quoted In:
McCorkle, P. "Delta vision emerges; Meeting stimulates discussion." Delta Democrat Times, May 13, 2003.



Laura Miller, Mayor of Dallas, TX

"It's a win-win for everybody." Miller said. "We are the No. 1 restaurant city in America, and we're going to stay that way."

Quoted In:
Miller, B. "Dallas Smoking Ban Now in Effect." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, March 2, 2003



Wayne Brown, former Mayor of Mesa, AZ

"Despite my original concerns about the economic effects and similar concerns by the Mesa Convention and Visitors Bureau, we worked every closely with the entire community. Eventually the potential that clean indoor air can be developed as a true positive for a community came into reality. The businesses within Mesa have fared very well with our ordinance. There are now enforcement problems."

Quoted In:
Brown, W.J., "Mesa businesses dealing well with law," [n.s.], February 24, 2002.



Steve Kirchhoff, Mayor of Bozeman, MT

"The Bozeman community is now being protected from a substance containing carcinogens and other toxins. Our…effort resulted in one of the strongest laws in the country. We appreciate the recognition from this national organization [ANR]."

Quoted In:
City Of Bozeman, Montana Recognized For Strong Smokefree Law. ANR Press Release, October 6, 2003.



Jerry Reiss, Vice-Mayor of San Louis Obispo, CA

"The City of San Louis Obispo has had a Smoking Ordinance in place since 1979…[and recently] extended the scope of the Ordinance to include all enclosed areas accessible to the public. [W]ith three months of experience, I am very pleased to report that the implementation of the ordinance has gone remarkably smoothly. With respect to implementation, costs have been relatively minimal. In summary the city's smoking ordinance has been a success."

Quoted In:
Reiss, J., "[Letter re: implementation of San Luis Obispo clean indoor air ordinance]," San Luis Obispo: City of San Luis Obispo, Office of the City Council, November 29, 1990.



Bill Walton, Mayor of Central Point, Oregon

"[The purpose] of the ordinance is to create a smoke free workplace, including restaurants. Beyond the aspects of community role modeling to our youth, we will be curtailing the annual deaths in Jackson County directly attributed to tobacco related products…As your mayor, I request a "no" vote on the repeal of the Central Point non-smoking ordinance."

Quoted In:
Walton, B., "The smoking ban will curb youth addiction, help Jackson County," Mail Tribune, [2000.].



Anne Rudin, Mayor of Sacramento, CA

"I verified with our Environmental Health Division that no Sacramento restaurants-large or small-had gone out of business because of the nonsmoking law. I also learned that since the ordinance went into effect [two years ago], not one restaurant has applied for an exemption from the law due to financial hardship, a provision in our ordinance."

Quoted In:
Rudin, A., "[Letter to Madison, Wisconsin mayor Paul R. Soglin re: Madison's proposed smokefree restaurant ordinance]," Sacramento: Office of the Mayor, October 22, 1992.